Race Day 2020

23 February

A big thank you to everyone who took part in race day 2020

Women's Race winner

Nearly 8,000 runners turned out for our special 30th anniversary edition of the Brighton Half yesterday. Whether you were running, volunteering or spectating, we’d like to say a huge thank you every single one of you for braving the elements and taking part to make race day 2020 such an extra special day.

The race klaxon was sounded at 9:30am by the original 1990 race winner, David Knight, and Brighton’s favourite resident, Norman Cook, also waved the runners off on their journey around the city’s sights.

The race field featured hundreds of runners new to the half marathon distance, plus experienced half marathoners and runners training for a full Spring marathon. Thousands of spectators lined the route to cheer on the runners and crowds were entertained with music from The Sundaes and Alex Banks playing live at The Grand Brighton, headline sponsor of the race.

In the men’s race Brighton resident Kevin Moore took first place in an amazing time of 69 minutes and 5 seconds; second place went to Neil Boniface, who came home in 69 minutes and 17 seconds; third place went to four times race winner Paul Martelletti in 69 minutes and 40 seconds.

The women’s race was won by Phillipa Williams, who absolutely stormed home in an incredible 77 minutes and 55 seconds, followed by Heather Noone in 79 minutes and 53 seconds. Third place went to Maisie Trafford in 81 minutes and 08 seconds.

The Sussex Beacon Wheelchair Race also returned, with three entrants from the Coventry Godiva Harriers. First place went to Gary Cooper, who finished in 80 minutes and 49 seconds; Rob Smith came second in 92 minutes and 25 seconds. The female winner was local girl, Ellie Page who came home in 96 minutes and 39 seconds.

Alongside the elite field, thousands of charity runners took to the streets of the city, raising around one million pounds for over 35 charities, including local charities The Sussex Beacon and Chestnut Tree House, and national charities including Alzheimer’s Society and Macmillan.

Race director Martin Harrigan commented:
“What a race we had today! We are deeply honoured that nearly 8,000 runners braved the high winds and stormy conditions to run The Grand Brighton Half Marathon this morning. So many inspiring people, running for fantastic causes. Thank you to all families, spectators and volunteers who came out today to make The Grand Brighton Half Marathon such an incredible event! We couldn’t be more grateful to you all.

“I would also like to say a huge thank you to our headline sponsor, The Grand Brighton hotel and all of the other sponsors and charities who support this fantastic event.”

Andrew Mosley, general manager at main sponsor The Grand Brighton said:
“We couldn’t be more thrilled to have been headline sponsors of The Grand Brighton Half Marathon for our third year. It’s an incredible sight to see so many runners come from far and wide for such a fantastic event supporting great causes. Your contributions to The Sussex Beacon and all of the other race partners is immensely valued, particularly on this year’s 30th anniversary celebration. The race village had an amazing atmosphere once again, and it was a real privilege to greet runners at the finish line. Well done to everyone who took part in this year’s race!”


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February 20, 2020 at 6:32 pm

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Common questions ahead of race day

Help! My race number hasn’t arrived. What do I do?

You can pick up a spare race number from the Help Desk in Race Village. This is open from 2-4pm on Saturday, and from 7:30am on race morning. See our race map for the location of the Help Desk.

Can I move start pen?

You can move back a pen (into a slower predicated time), but please don’t move forward. If you think you will run faster than your predicted time we recommend you move to the front of your current start pen.

Is there an app?

There is no app for the race this year.

Can I discard clothing at the start of the race?

Yes, all discarded clothing will be collected at the start of the race, so you are welcome to bring a warm layer and leave it to the side of you pen as you start the race. Please be careful if you discard any clothing to avoid it becoming a trip hazard for other runners. All discarded clothing will be given to charity.


Weather update and race day

Weather

Update: Saturday 11:00am: The wind is looking to peak at 6am tomorrow then will gradually drop through the morning. With rain also a possibility, we recommend bringing along a warm layer for the start pens. All discarded clothing will be collected at the start of the race and given to charity. Please be careful if you do discard any clothing to avoid it becoming a trip hazard for other runners.

We will have a team of tail walkers for the final participants this year so please don’t worry about being slow!

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Update: Friday 5:00pm: We have had a few questions this afternoon about the weather on race day. We’ve been in close contact with forecasters from the Met Office throughout the week. The latest reports say that it will be windy, with strong gusts and possible rain, so we advise you to bring layers on Sunday – a windproof/waterproof jacket is ideal, plus think about bringing a hat, gloves and a wind buff, if you have them. Pack some warm clothing for when you finish too.

Please remember that if you plan to use our baggage service, please bring a waterproof, secure bag.

See you Sunday!

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Following on from the severe weather over the past few weeks, we have been advised by the Met Office that strong winds are forecast to continue in the build up to the race and on race day. While this won’t affect the race taking place on Sunday, it means that we are unable to build some of the infrastructure that you would normally see around the event. This is to keep all of our runners and spectators safe.

Our baggage service will still operate as normal but please note this area will not be under cover. If you plan to leave any belongings with us, please bring a waterproof, secure bag and be sure to attach the baggage label with your race number on to your bag. This label is attached to your race number. The start gantry will also be affected by the winds, and again, we are unable to build this structure. The start/finish line will however be clearly marked and you’ll run over a timing mat as you go over the line.

Please wear appropriate clothing for the weather. We advise bringing layers – and a windproof jacket if you have one!

See you on race day!

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at 5:42 pm

Youth Race

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Youth Race postponed on Sunday

Due to the weather conditions this week, we are unfortunately unable to build the infrastructure for the Youth Race to go ahead successfully on Sunday and have taken the decision to postpone our junior races.

We plan to reschedule the Youth Race for later in the year and will let you know in due course about this. Please keep hold of your T-shirts and race numbers so you can use them again.

The Sussex Beacon apologises for any inconvenience this may have caused you and we thank you for your continued support. 


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February 11, 2020 at 4:19 pm

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Penny Farthing parade to lead out runners on race day

Penny Farthings outside the i360

To celebrate our big birthday we’ll have a fantastic Penny Farthing parade leading runners out on race day.

The Penny Farthing Club is led by club founder Neil Laughton. Neil has ridden his Penny Farthing bicycle from Lands End to John O’Groats, is captain of the England Penny Farthing polo team and holds three Guinness World Records for riding a Penny Farthing without using his hands! If you fancy learning to ride one of these Victorian bicycles, you can find out more at Penny Farthing Bike Tour Brighton or contact them at the Penny Farthing Club.


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at 2:10 pm

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2020 event news

We have had a few queries about this year’s race and a small cluster of coronavirus cases in Brighton. Each year we work closely with the NHS locally and the South East Coast Ambulance Service and they are directly involved in the planning process for the event. In all matters of public health, we strictly follow the recommendations of the government, health agencies and the NHS.

Coronavirus is a developing situation for the authorities and we are in close contact with NHS England and Brighton & Hove council regarding this. There is no change to the planned event on 23 February.

You can find the latest information and advice from Public Health England at www.gov.uk/coronavirus.


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January 23, 2020 at 6:00 am

Brighton Half Marathon 2020  |  Race news

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How to prevent injuries in the lead up to race day

Runners

With the countdown to The Grand Brighton Half Marathon officially underway, it’s important to look after yourself during this intense time, and make sure you don’t sustain any injuries before the big day. We’ve teamed up with our partner Runners Need to bring you expert advice on avoiding injury to make sure you’re in top shape for race day.

Listen to your body

Bear in mind that every runner is different. We all have different injury thresholds, which means that the golden rule when training for the half marathon is to listen to your body. Being honest with yourself about your limits, and not forcing your body past them, will mean more effective training, a minimised risk of injury and, most of all, a happy and successful race.

Before a run: preparation is everything

The importance of warming up before a run cannot be emphasised enough. Warming up is essential for reducing your risk of injury. It loosens up your muscles, gets your heart rate up and primes your body for exercise. Plus, starting with a warm-up jog prevents you from getting too tired on your run and stopping your run early, which can harm your motivation.

Strength training in the gym alongside running is critical to half marathon success, particularly targeting glutes, calves and hamstrings. It helps to prevent injury in these key areas by building up the muscle in your legs, therefore preparing them for endurance running. Building a strong core is also essential for running form, as it stabilises your upper body which improves your posture and speed.

During your run: be methodical

During your training runs is when listening to your body comes into play. Running injuries don’t suddenly appear: there are always warning signs (aches, pains, soreness) which you need to be careful not to ignore. It’s also important to remember that recovery days exist to allow your muscles time to repair, and over-training will only increase your risk of injury, so ensure you have – and stick to! – a training plan which includes enough recovery time.

In fact, a training plan is a cornerstone of effective half marathon training. Plans are entirely individual and depend on the runner’s current fitness level, running goal and time available. You should consult a running specialist to help you establish an attainable goal and develop a plan which will ensure you reach it without hurting yourself.

During your half marathon training, you should gradually increase your mileage to ensure you don’t put too much stress on your body before it’s ready – a sure way to get injured. Varying the pace and length of your runs will allow you to train for both speed and endurance leading up to the half marathon and will make sure you’re not putting too much consistent strain on your body. A great tip is to check out the profile of the course you’ll be running so you can prepare accordingly, such as if the course is particularly hilly. Luckily for you, the Brighton half marathon course is nice and flat!

A tapering period, in which you cut down on training as the half marathon approaches, can dramatically reduce your risk of injury on the day, and prevent problems during your recovery period. Every runner’s tapering period will differ in length and intensity, and the person with whom you develop your training plan will advise you on this. Tapering may seem counterintuitive, and many runners believe it will damage their performance, but your hard training should be done by this time. Tapering is a chance for the changes you’ve made to take effect: the ways in which you grow faster and fitter through training are called ‘training adaptations’, and actually take place during recovery. So, whilst you’re running less in your taper period, your body is still working hard to get you ready for race day.

After a session: don’t underestimate recovery

You must never forget to properly recover after every run. Recovery is as important to half marathon preparation as training is, and a necessary step to prevent injuries. Stretching to cool down after every run is a must, as is using rollers and massage kits to keep your circulation going and rid the body of toxins. Again, ensuring your training plan includes scheduled recovery days after hard or long sessions is key.

Peak performance from the ground up

Running in the right shoes is essential not only for preventing injuries, but for performing at your best and getting the most out of your training. Runners Need offers free gait analysis and shoe fittings with in-store experts, who will help match you with your perfect running shoe. You’ll also find the latest innovations in performance fabrics, high-tech gadgets and nutrition science, as well as advice born from experience to help you smash the race!


Charity of the Week: Alzheimer’s Society

Join Alzheimer's Society

Dementia devastates lives. It strips away memories, relationships and connections to the world. For someone with the condition, as well as their family and friends, dementia means the plans you made, and the future you thought you had, will not be so.

By 2025, over a million people will be living with the condition. Of the world’s top ten killer diseases, it’s the only one we can’t cure, prevent or even slow down. Too many people face dementia alone, finding it difficult to know who to turn to or where to go for information and support.

At Alzheimer’s Society, we know it doesn’t have to be like this. We are investing more money than ever in dementia research and until the day we find a cure, we will be here for anyone affected by dementia – wherever they are, whatever they’re going through.

Run for Team Macmillan

Alzheimer’s Society are the UK’s leading dementia charity. Every day, we work tirelessly to find new treatments and, ultimately, a cure for dementia. We provide expert information, training, and support services to all those who need our help. And we are creating a more dementia friendly society so people with the condition can live without fear and prejudice.

How you can help

We want to stop dementia in its tracks through research. We’re committed to spending £150 million on cutting-edge research over the next decade but can only do this with the support of people like you. By joining Team Alzheimer’s Society at the Brighton Half Marathon, you can help us continue investing in our researchers and get us closer to our vision of a world without dementia.

£75 can pay for 20 microtome blades, used to create slices of the brain the thickness of a human hair. This enables researchers to study the intricate detail of brain cells, and the toxic proteins that cause dementia.

£100 covers Alzheimer’s Society’s cost of supporting one patient with early stage Alzheimer’s for three months on one of our vital trials. Their time and dedication provide us with the potential to treat symptoms and slow the progression of dementia.

£250 can pay for 100 microlitres of a special chemical that is applied to brain tissue, allowing researchers to study how brain cells are affected by the disease.

The benefits of joining Team Alzheimer’s Society

In return we’ll support you every step of the way, and provide you with some fantastic benefits:

  • A fundraising pack with advice and inspiration to help you smash your target
  • An Alzheimer’s Society running top to wear with pride on the day
  • Access to our training zone, with training guides for all abilities as well as information from our professional coaches on everything you need to get you race-ready, including nutrition and tapering
  • The most incredible race-day experience with the loudest cheer points on the course and a hero’s welcome at our post-race marquee where you can pick up some refreshments
  • Most importantly, the knowledge that you are helping Alzheimer’s Society get one step closer to beating dementia

Join Team Alzheimer’s Society at the Brighton Half Marathon and you miles can help us beat dementia.

Run for Team Macmillan


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December 29, 2019 at 7:41 pm

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Charity of the Week: Macmillan

Team Macmillan runners

Being told ‘you have cancer’ can affect so much more than your health – it can also affect your familyyour job, even your ability to pay the bills. But you’re still you. We get that. And, after over 100 years of helping people through cancer, we get what’s most important: that you’re treated as a person, not just a patient. Through better treatment we have added years to life but now we need to add life to years.

Run for Team Macmillan

Macmillan is the UK’s leading cancer supporter charity giving personal, one to one care and support to thousands of people every day. We are the only charity supporting anyone, no matter their age, where they live or their cancer diagnosis. It’s why we’ll take the time to understand what matters. We help people make sense of their diagnosis and guide them through treatment, so we can help get the support needed to take care of their health, protect their personal relationships and deal with money and work worries.

In Brighton and Hove an average of 1,365 people are diagnosed with cancer each year. In 2018, Macmillan had 10 professionals working in Brighton and Hove and they gave out 100 grants totalling £38,500 to help cancer patients in the local area. This was only possible due to the amazing fundraising efforts of people like you!

How you can help

Without our amazing fundraisers we wouldn’t be able to provide the vital services and support that people living with cancer need. Join Team Macmillan for the Brighton Half Marathon and help us reach our goal of being with everyone from their point of diagnosis:

  • £52 could help run a large Macmillan Information & Support Centre for 1 hour
  • £100 could pay for a person affected by cancer to attend a Health and Wellbeing event, providing them with skills to improve the management of these areas in their lives
  • £145 could pay for a Macmillan Grant that would make a significant contribution to the cost of a person’s travel to hospital for cancer treatment.
  • £221 could pay for a Macmillan nurse for 1 day, helping people living with cancer and their families receive essential medical, practical and emotional support
  • £500 could pay for a Macmillan professional to attend an advanced course in pain and symptom control. This would help the professional provide better advice to people with cancer on how to control their symptoms and deal with the pain caused by treatment.

Macmillan runners at the finish lineHow we’ll support you

In return we’ll support you every step of the way, and provide you with these resources free of charge:

  • A fundraising pack which will have all the help you’ll need to absolutely smash your fundraising target
  • A Macmillan technical T-shirt or running vest, plus iron on letters to customise your kit
  • Access to the Macmillan training zone to make sure you’re ready for race day
  • The loudest applause from our world-famous Macmillan cheer points who will give you the encouragement to finish in your best time
  • Exclusive access to our hospitality marquee on race day, which will be full of refreshments and a lot of camaraderie from your fellow runners

So, what are you waiting for? Get the support you need to get to the finish line whilst raising money to help people living with cancer.

Run for Team Macmillan


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December 15, 2019 at 6:00 am

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Make a difference with every step for Chestnut Tree House

Join Team Chestnut

 

Become a half marathon hero with Team Chestnut whilst helping children and young people with life-shortening conditions across Sussex and South East Hampshire.

Amazing people like you help so many families every year. You help families create precious memories together at Chestnut Tree House, help care for children in their own homes, help give carers time to recharge their batteries, and help parents through the most difficult time of saying goodbye.

 

Whether you’re a running rookie or distance dynamo, we’re here for every step of your journey. As a Chestnut Tree House runner you’ll be invited to our coffee catch ups and training runs, plus we’ll be there to cheer you along on the day and welcome you home with well-deserved refreshments.

You’ll also get a bespoke Chestnut Tree House running vest to wear with pride during training runs and on the day. All we ask for joining Team Chestnut is that you commit to raising £200.

 

The money you raise helps in so many ways and really does make a huge difference in the lives of children and families across Sussex. Here are just a few ways it helps…

  • £150: Allows a family of four to stay overnight together at Chestnut Tree House knowing their child is cared for all night.
  • £220: Gives carers a few hours respite and time together as their child is cared for in their own home.
  • £230: Puts on a ‘Stay & Play’ session at Chestnut Tree House for children to enjoy a range of activities and make precious memories.
  • £268: Means 5 families and their children can enjoy time together and feel free in the hydrotherapy pool at Chestnut Tree House.
  • £285: Covers the cost of all care services provided at Chestnut Tree House for one hour.

Join Team Chestnut. For yourself. For local families. For making precious memories. For the Now.

If you have any questions about joining Team Chestnut or your fundraising, please feel free to call us anytime on 01903 706355, we are here to help you throughout your fundraising journey with us.


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December 10, 2019 at 6:00 am

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Charity of the Week: The Sussex Beacon

 


Run with Team Beacon and support the charity behind The Grand Brighton Half Marathon!

Over the last four years of The Grand Brighton Half Marathon, Team Beacon has rapidly grown. Thanks to their dedicated support and generosity, we have been able to provide specialist care and support to many people living with HIV.

2019 was another big year for Team Beacon, as we provided extra special and exclusive facilities in the race village for our runners for a second year to maximize the race day experience for Team Beacon. We were thrilled to meet our runners, to celebrate with them as they proudly posed with their medals for free professional photos and to congratulate them with well-deserved sweet treats and hot soup.

Due to the fantastic feedback and rocketing Team Beacon sign up numbers for the 2019 race, our team are busy working on an even better marquee for our dedicated runners and supporters. Our spectacular Team Beacon marquee promises to deliver an exclusive baggage area, warming and delicious catering, photographer, comfy seating, motivational music, post-race reception and much more – all in one place in the race village! Thanks to our loyal sponsor Glencairn Consulting Ltd, our runners will also receive their technical Team Beacon running vest straight to their door, so they can train proudly in their team colours. Fundraising resources, competitions, training runs and race day information is just a few taps away with our Team Beacon Facebook Group, where runners can ask questions and share training tips.

The Sussex Beacon needs you!

Over 100,000 people live with HIV in the UK, a number which increases every day. With daily medication people living with HIV can lead normal lives, however many suffer with psychological effects and HIV-related illnesses, such as cancer and dementia. The complex combination of HIV and related illnesses require specialist treatment. Brighton has the 2nd highest HIV prevalence in the UK, and access to specialist care and support is vital. With a 10-bed inpatient unit, The Sussex Beacon provides 24 hour medical and psychological care to people struggling with a new diagnosis, starting new medication, recovering from HIV-related cancer treatment and dementia, requiring family services and end of life care. Most of all, it provides a safe, comforting place for patients in their time of need. You can help us continue to offer support to those who need it most.

Click here to find out more and join Team Beacon

 


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November 7, 2019 at 3:39 pm

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The Active for Life Running Challenge youth programme

The Sussex Beacon, the charity behind the Brighton Half Marathon, have been working in partnership with Active for Life on their annual Running Challenge programme for several years. The programme offers reduced entry into our Brighton Half Youth Races, a fun, one-mile race aimed at children of all abilities aged 7-17.

The Active for Life Running Challenge programme supports children in Y3-Y6 to train and participate in The Brighton Half Youth Race and the Mini Mile; two prestigious local running events.

The goal is to set yourself a challenge to run your personal best at both races.

The Active for Life team work with local schools to target those children who are the least active and /or would like the opportunity to get involved with the Running Challenge to help boost their confidence and self-esteem through physical activity. It also helps with getting the young people active and achieving their Active 60 Minutes a day and hopefully also inspiring their families to get involved too.

The project is run by Brighton & Hove City Council, Healthy Lifestyles team, to support people in the city to lead active lifestyles. Active for Life has grown into a city-wide initiative which reaches out to thousands of Brighton & Hove residents every year, supporting them to become more active, more often.

To find out more about Running Challenge email Vanessa.lynham@brighton-hove.gov.uk

“My grandson joined Active for Life after discussions with school and his physiotherapist at Seaside view. He suffers from DCD and his mobility is challenging for him at times. He had little confidence to join in sports as he had low self-esteem around his size and ‘clumsiness’ as he described it. We encouraged him to give it a go and see how he felt after a couple of sessions.

“You have all been very supportive with encouraging him that it’s all about the taking part and not the competitiveness.  He has achieved so much more self-esteem since he began, although it’s a work in progress. He was so proud of himself after completing his Youth Race and didn’t stop telling everyone and showing his medal off. He is really looking forward to completing his next run in April and getting another medal for his collection.”

 

“My daughter’s participation in the AFL Running Challenge has hugely raised her self-confidence and self-esteem. Being able to find a platform where her skills and abilities are rewarded and acknowledged away from academic success, has undoubtedly built on her own self-worth and her understanding that we all have skills in different areas.

“The running challenge enables her to shine, and challenge herself, away from the pressures of academia. For all learners, like my daughter, I think this is vital in building their resilience and self-confidence at a time when pressures on young people from social media etc are at an all-time high. 

“I also feel that the team spirit involved in the training and on the day of events is a wonderful and rewarding experience for all of them. They are able to bond over their experiences, positive and negative and support each other’s involvement. It’s not just about winning but about taking part and supporting each other, regardless of ability.”


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Take a sneak peek at our anniversary medal

Drum roll please… we’re delighted to reveal the special medal for our 30th anniversary race on 23rd February. We don’t know about you, but it’s got us very excited about race day next year!

If you haven’t yet entered but want one of these bling beauties, enter soon as we’re getting close to sell out for general entries. Once we sell out, we never re-open the race so this is your last chance.

 


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August 21, 2019 at 9:57 am

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Meet our first place winner from 30 years ago

Brighton Half celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2020 and as part of the celebrations, we’ve been taking a jaunt down memory lane. We were lucky enough to meet the first ever winner of the race back in 1990 –  David Knight.

David Knight at our launch night with wife Mandi

What was your winning time back in that very first Brighton Half in 1990?

I think about 1hr 7mins.

Was there a prize for winning the race?
A medal and £25 vouchers I think.

Do you recall who came second and third that first year?
I’m not sure the first year, but in the second year the second runner was Mike Smith, but there was a bit of drama as even though I beat him by 4mins 45secs, because I entered on the day, I wasn’t allowed the first medal – they gave it to him! (See the news cutting at the foot of the blog).

What was the route for that first race?
It started at the Marina and ran along the undercliff then back on ourselves on the top road – Marine Parade. After that I can’t remember!

Do you recall how many runners took part?
There was about 400-450.

How did you find out about the race – was it very much a club event back then?
I ran for Brighton & Hove Athletics Club, and was invited to run by Ron Grover of Arena 80.

Were there many people watching?
Sam Lambourn cycled in front with me, but there were only really people at the finish. None of the roads were closed back then.

Have you carried on running in the 30 years since?
Yes little bits – I stopped in 1995 as my wife was very ill fighting cancer, but she’s fine now. At the time I was sponsored by Adidas.

Do you think the running industry has changed much over the 30 years?
There is bigger prize money, which has brought more elite runners from all over the world. And because of the fitness boom, there are a lot more runners doing it to keep fit and healthy.

Do you know if people ran for charities in races back in the early 1990s?
Yes they did.

out on the first place medal because race rules disallowed his 'on the day entry'.

A press cutting from The Argus in 1991 after David Knight missed out on the first place medal because race rules disallowed his ‘on the day entry’.

 

 


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July 18, 2019 at 10:43 am

The Sussex Beacon Relay

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Back by popular demand – The Sussex Beacon Relay!

 

Back by popular demand for a third year, our Relay race is now open!

The Sussex Beacon Relay gives you chance to experience the brilliant buzz of race day but take part in a relay format with friends. We split the race into 5k chunks and you and three other friends run a leg each.

Our Relay teams will battle it out to complete the course in the quickest time, with the top 3 teams winning an award and prize.

The Sussex Beacon Relay is a team fundraising challenge for the charity behind the half – The Sussex Beacon. The Relay event is primarily a fundraising event to raise vital funds for our services which help people living with HIV. Each team is asked to fundraise a minimum of £200 – but the sky’s the limit! We’ll be awarding a Top Fundraiser prize and award to the team which fundraises the most for the charity.

Fancy it? Grab three friends / family members / work colleagues and sign up. You can find out more about the Relay here.


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April 18, 2019 at 2:40 pm

Brighton Half Marathon 2020  |  Race news

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2020 registration now open!

 

Drumroll please… We’re excited to say that entry to The Grand Brighton Half Marathon 2020 is now open! Whether you’ve run with us before or this will be your first half marathon, we hope you’ll join us for a very special race day next year…

Celebrating 30 years

2020 will be a particularly special race as we’ll be celebrating the 30 year anniversary of the event. We have lots of plans up our sleeves to celebrate our big birthday, so this is a year not to be missed! The date for your calendar is Sunday 23rd February 2020.

Early bird entry

Early bird entry is now open for a limited time so enter soon to take advantage of the pricing – be sure to tell your running friends and family too.

 

 

 


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December 9, 2018 at 5:00 am

Charity news  |  Race news  |  The 2019 race

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Run with Team Beacon and support the charity behind The Grand Brighton Half Marathon!

Run with Team Beacon and support the charity behind The Grand Brighton Half Marathon!

Over the last three years of The Grand Brighton Half Marathon, Team Beacon has rapidly grown with 600 runners fundraising over £86,000 for The Sussex Beacon. Thanks to their dedicated support and generosity, we have been able to provide specialist care and support to many people living with HIV.

2018 was a big year for Team Beacon, as we provided extra special and exclusive facilities in the race village for our runners to maximize the race day experience for Team Beacon. We were thrilled to meet our runners, to celebrate with them as they proudly posed with their medals for free professional photos and to congratulate them with well-deserved sweet treats and hot soup.

Check out the feedback from our 2018 Team Beacon here.

Due to the fantastic feedback and rocketing Team Beacon sign up numbers for the 2019 race, our team are busy working on an even better marquee for our dedicated runners and supporters. Our spectacular Team Beacon marquee promises to deliver an exclusive baggage area, warming and delicious catering, photographer, comfy seating, motivational music, post-race reception and much more – all in one place in the race village! Thanks to our loyal sponsor Glencairn Consulting Ltd, our runners will also receive their technical Team Beacon running vest straight to their door, so they can train proudly in their team colours. Fundraising resources, competitions, training runs and race day information is just a few taps away with our Team Beacon Facebook Group, where runners can ask questions and share training tips. All runners will be supported by our Challenge Events Fundraiser from the moment they sign up, to the moment they receive their personalised celebratory certificate in March 2019.

The Sussex Beacon needs you!

Over 101,000 people live with HIV in the UK, a number which increases every day. With daily medication people living with HIV can lead normal lives, however many suffer with psychological effects and HIV-related illnesses, such as cancer and dementia. The complex combination of HIV and related illnesses require specialist treatment. Brighton has the 2nd highest HIV prevalence in the UK, and access to specialist care and support is vital. With a 10-bed inpatient unit, The Sussex Beacon provides 24 hour medical and psychological care to people struggling with a new diagnosis, starting new medication, recovering from HIV-related cancer treatment and dementia, requiring family services and end of life care. Most of all, it provides a safe, comforting place for patients in their time of need. You can help us continue to offer support to those who need it most.

If you would like to be a part of Team Beacon and experience a race day like no other, find out more and secure your place now.


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November 29, 2018 at 4:54 pm

Charity news  |  Race news  |  The 2019 race

Tags: ,

Meet the charity behind the event

 

The Brighton Half Marathon celebrates its 29th birthday on race day 2019 – but did you know the race is a charity event, organised by local HIV charity The Sussex Beacon? As World Aids Day approaches on 1st December, find out about the local charity behind a very big race.

The Grand Brighton Half Marathon is The Sussex Beacon’s largest fundraising event each year, where we welcome 12,000 runners and thousands of spectators to celebrate running in the city. Unbeknownst to many, The Sussex Beacon has been involved in the event since its early days in the 1990s.

The Sussex Beacon cause

Brighton has the 2nd highest HIV prevalence in the UK, and access to specialist care and support is vital. With a 10-bed inpatient unit, The Sussex Beacon provides 24 hour medical and psychological care to people struggling with a new diagnosis, starting new medication, recovering from HIV-related cancer treatment and dementia, requiring family services and end of life care. Most of all, it provides a safe, comforting place for patients in their time of need.

Over 100,000 people live with HIV in the UK, a number which increases every day. With daily medication people living with HIV can lead normal lives, however many suffer with psychological effects and HIV-related illnesses, such as cancer and dementia. The complex combination of HIV and related illnesses require specialist treatment.

World Aids Day

Saturday 1st December marks World AIDS Day, a day dedicated to raising awareness of HIV/AIDS. It’s an opportunity for our community (and the world!) to unite in the fight against HIV, to remember those who have died, and to show our support for those living with HIV today.

Show your support

The Sussex Beacon has its own running team in the event – Team Beacon. If you already have a general race place you can also fundraise for the charity as an ‘own place runner‘- every little amount of fundraising really does help. You could also show your support on race day by rocking a red ribbon on your race kit.

Find out more about the wider work of The Sussex Beacon on the charity’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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October 9, 2018 at 2:14 pm

Race news  |  The 2019 race

Tags: ,

Win a night at The Grand Brighton, running shoes from Runner’s Need & more…

Win a night’s stay and afternoon tea for two at The Grand Brighton, plus gait analysis and a pair of running shoes from Runner’s Need!

Together with our race partners The Grand Brighton and Runner’s Need, we are offering anyone who enters the race before midnight on the 31st October the chance to win this amazing prize:

  • A night’s stay for two people at The Grand Brighton
  • Afternoon tea for two at The Grand Brighton
  • Gait analysis and expert shoe fitting from Runner’s Need
  • A pair of running shoes of your choice from Runner’s Need

To be in with a chance of winning this brilliant prize from our partners, simply enter the race before midnight on 31st October 2018.  Terms and conditions apply – please see below for details.

Terms & conditions
This prize entitles you to a one night stay for two in a Classic Double Room at The Grand Brighton, inclusive of breakfast and afternoon tea for two. The prize is available to redeem from Sunday – Thursday until 24th February 2019, exclusive of bank holidays and special occasion dates. Date restrictions may apply and are subject to availability. Other terms and conditions may apply.

The competition is open to anyone who entered the race from March – October 31st 2018.

 


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July 26, 2018 at 2:49 pm

Charity news  |  Race news  |  The 2019 race

Tags: ,

10 reasons to run for charity


Ever considered running for charity? Here are 10 reasons to use your run for good.

1. Raise funds for a cause close to your heart

Using a personal challenge to raise funds for a good cause that you truly care about is an amazing thing. A few pounds from your family and friends  can quickly mount up and help a good cause. You could be funding medical treatment for a person in need, a day out for a poorly child, a help line for vulnerable people, access to water for children without, animals who need protection, life-saving medical research, emotional support for people undergoing treatment or psychological support for people with mental health issues. If you are signing up to run an event, you have the opportunity to share your achievements with others who truly need it.

2. Raise awareness of the charity

Money is not all that is important for charities. Runners will often wear a charity vest provided by their chosen charity, many of you will set up a JustGiving page and a lot of you will share your journey on your multiple social media channels. For every person who sees your challenge, someone is learning about the charity and their cause. Raising awareness can be just as key as raising funds, and this awareness could have a long-term impact. You inspire new supporters and new fundraisers, and before you know it one action has triggered hundreds more just like yours. Pretty cool, huh?

3. Get motivated

Let’s be honest, running a half marathon is hard! There may be moments when you doubt yourself and reconsider whether the early morning winter runs, the slips on the ice and the pressure to get fitter are worth it. In fact, we see a huge drop-out rate of runners because they haven’t trained enough or couldn’t brave the brisk weather on race morning. But a charity runner is lacing up their running shoes for a cause, for their family and friends that have sponsored them, for the impact they know they will have on people who need help the most. They are running for those who can’t – what’s better motivation than that?

4. Gain a support network

When that motivation is slipping, we need people around us to support our goal and tell us to keep going. To provide us with advice, tips and opportunities to help us soldier on. Running for a charity means you are part of a team that is supporting each other to achieve a common goal. Many charities have team meet ups, Facebook groups, and regular email communications to ensure you never feel alone on your journey to the finish line.

5. Make new friends

Joining a charity team is a fantastic way to meet new people and make friends. You already have two things in common: you like running and you care about the same charity – that’s a good start! Runners often share training runs and arrange regular meet ups, you are sometimes invited to team events where you can ‘mingle’ with your team mates, and many charities offer access to a dedicated marquee on race day where you can meet other runners and start the race together.

6. Get added extras on race day

Not only do you have the support of your friends, family and fellow runners, but you also have the full support of the charity you are running for. All charities vary in the level of supportive benefits they can provide, but offerings can include a branded running vest, a fundraising pack, regular emails of encouragement, Christmas cards, branded merchandise, pre-event meet ups, race day hospitality, dedicated baggage area (The Sussex Beacon only at the Brighton Half), food and beverages, cheer teams along the course, post-race reception and free photography.

7. Tick off something from your life ‘bucket list’

For many, running a half marathon is an experience they have never felt before – the buzzing atmosphere as thousands of runners wait eagerly at the start line, the roaring cheers from the crowds, the emotional ups and downs of the course, the feeling of determination as you resist the urge to give up, the elation as you cross the finish line, the pride as you receive your medal, the gratitude of a goody bag and a massage at the end! Running for charity enhances every moment, starting with team mates on a common mission, crowds chanting the name on your charity running vest, the motivation to keep going for those who are relying on you to finish, the euphoria of knowing you have made a difference to more than one life when you crossed that finish line and receive that medal for every person, child or animal you fundraised to help.

8. Improve your health & wellbeing

Whether you are running to shift those few extra pounds you gained over Christmas from too much turkey and chocolate, boost your overall fitness levels, tone up ready for summer, clear your mind or just need a hobby, running The Grand Brighton Half Marathon is a great opportunity to reach your goal, whatever that may be. Motivation and support are key to achieving our goals, so run for charity to give you the best chance of succeeding!

9. Feel happier

Doing good makes you feel good, right? And that’s not the only reason running for charity can make you happier. It’s a social activity, and studies have shown that socialising can decrease feelings of depression and boost feelings of well-being. Running itself is fantastic for our mental health, it also combats depression, improves our capacity to learn new information, alleviates anxiety, helps us sleep and can even boost self-esteem. But you need to stick at it, so you need that motivation and support to reap the benefits.

10. Do something different

If we did the same things every day, life would get a bit dull. Fundraising for charity opens up a world of opportunities to do weird and wacky things, tackle new challenges, have new experiences and meet new people. Often winter can be a time we slip into mundane routines of staying indoors, watching tv and eating junk food. Why not make a change this year: register to run for a charity in The Grand Brighton Half Marathon – who knows what opportunities and experiences you will unlock!

See all our charity partners here.

By Rosie Hemming, Challenge Events Fundraiser, The Sussex Beacon


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July 5, 2018 at 1:24 pm

Race news  |  The 2019 race

Runner’s guide to Brighton

Runner's guide to Brighton

 

Running The Grand Brighton Half Marathon? Here’s the lowdown on how to make the most of your stay by the seaside.

The Laines

Brighton does eclectic better than anywhere and the North Laines are home to vintage boutiques, cupcake shops and cafes galore. Snooper’s Paradise is a dusty curiosity shop packed to the rafters with memorabilia from childhood and well worth a mooch around if you have any time spare around race day.

The seafront and Palace Pier

Brighton’s seafront has had a bit of a makeover in recent years, with seaside-shabby now seaside-chic. New boutiques have popped up under the arches close to the beautiful Victorian Band Stand and new-ish landmark the British Airways i360 now stands majestic on the seafront, offering views to France on especially clear days. There’s a collection of restaurants, cafes, bars and clubs on the seafront. And you can’t leave the seaside without a mosey on the Palace Pier, where you’ll find quintessential British seaside fodder: fish and chips, ice creams and candy floss.

The Royal Pavilion

Former Royal residence the Pavilion was a party palace, a seaside retreat for George, Prince of Wales, who became the Prince Regent in 1811. The building is Brighton’s answer to the Taj Mahal, with opulent Indian architecture on the exterior and contrasting Chinese décor in the interior. It’s unlike any other building in Britain – and it epitomises this eclectic, vibrant city rather perfectly.

Steve Ovett statue

Eagle eyes won’t have to walk far to see the statue of local Olympian Ovett on race day of The Grand Brighton Half Marathon – the bronze statue erected ahead of the London 2012 Olympics lies in the race village, a fitting tribute to the Brighton-born runner who went on to break the world record for the 1,500m and mile run in 1980.

Coffee shops

Independent coffee shops are thriving in Brighton and Hove and the locals have followed their noses and shunned the big chains in favour of indies producing great roasts. Small Batch has a number of outlets dotted throughout the city, then there’s Flour Pot Bakery, Café Coho, Marwoods, Bond St Coffee, plus plenty more.

Cinemas

You’ll need to put your feet up after the race and Brighton is home to four cinemas, all within walking range of the race village on the seafront. The Odeon on the seafront and Cineworld at the Marina are the places to watch blockbusters, while Komedia and the Duke of York tend to screen art house films. The latter also claims to be the oldest cinema in continuous use in Britain.

Hotel, food & drink close to Race Village

Hotels close to race village

The Grand Brighton – 4*
Premier Inn, North Street – 3*
MyHotel – 4*
Seattle Hotel – 3*
Blanche House – 3*
Hilton Brighton Metropole – 4*
Hotel du Vin – 4*
Royal Albion – 2.5*
Umi hotel – 3*
Queen’s hotel – 3*
Ibis – 2*
See more suggestions, including B&Bs, on our accommodation page.

Popular pubs

Basketmakers Arms, the North Laines
The North Laine Brewhouse, the North Laines
Brighton Rocks, Rock Place, Kemptown
The Black Dove, Kemptown
The Fountain Head, North Road
Pub du Vin, Ship Street
Earth & Stars, Windsor St

Grub

British: Bill’s, Pub du Vin
French: Mange Tout, Plateau
Veggie: Food for Friends, Terre a Terre
Meat & fish: The Coal Shed, The Salt Rooms
Pizza: Pizzaface (takeaway)
Burgers: Burger Brothers (takeaway), MeatLiquor
Pub food: The North Laines, the Bristol Bar, the Basketmakers, The Dorset, Yeoman, Earth & Stars

Sports massage, physio & osteopathy

Sundial, Queen’s Road
Body Rehab, Hove
Back in Brighton, North Street

 


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June 21, 2018 at 1:07 pm

Race news  |  The 2019 race

Eight truths & myths about sports nutrition

 

There are all sorts of nutrition tips out there – some good, some bad. Helping us to sort us the wheat from the chaff is sports nutritionist Renee McGregor, author of the book Training Food.

  1. Coffee increases fat metabolism and can help you lose weight = myth

“There is some evidence that caffeine – rather than just coffee – can boost your metabolism a little. Is it significant enough to cause a huge amount of weight loss? Probably not. I use it with athletes when we’re looking at performance – there’s a lot of evidence to show that using caffeine in the correct manner and in the correct dose can improve performance because it will affect your perceived effort – so particularly at the end of a race when you’re feeling quite tired. Typically I’ll get people to take a caffeine gel in the final 5k at the end of a marathon or half marathon. It can really help you to feel like you’re not as tired and the effort you’re putting in is slightly easier. But in terms of weight loss, there’s very little evidence to show that the increase is enough.”

  1. Eating late at night will cause you to gain weight = myth

“This is a good old fashioned myth. There’s very little proof behind it and it really depends how sedentary you are. If you’re quite active then eating late won’t do you any harm – you don’t suddenly start storing fat overnight. If you look at the chemistry, overnight is when you’re fasting so that’s generally when you’re breaking down your stores to use for energy and to keep your blood sugar levels constant. The problem really is if you over-consume calories during the day – if you over-consume you’re going to end up putting weight on.”

  1. Chocolate milkshake is great post workout fuel = truth

This is definitely true. Chocolate milk rehydrates, it’s got the right combination of carbs and protein, and it’s also got the right combination of the right types of carbs and protein. After a workout you’re going to need to refuel glycogen stores and repair muscles. You’re going to need an easily digestible carbohydrate and the lactose and sugar from the chocolate does that. And you’ll need an easily digestible protein which you’ll get from the whey in the milk, so it’s a really good choice.”

  1. Haribo or jelly sweets are as good as an energy gel for fuelling during a long run = truth

“You can indeed use jelly sweets in replacement for gels; it’s very much an individual preference on what you like to take during a run. Most energy gels will provide you with 20-30g of carbohydrate, so you’d need about 5 or 6 jelly babies to get the same amount. I tend to use gels because I find them easier – I find it too difficult to chew while I’m running, but my friend prefers to eat a jelly baby every few minutes to keep her going. It’s really just preference.”

  1. A high protein diet can help you to lose weight = truth

“Yes it can. I would never advocate a pure protein diet; I think you definitely need some carbohydrate in there but a high protein diet will help with satiety levels – so keeping you fuller for longer – and also help to maintain lean muscle mass while restricting your energy intake. Often when you restrict your calorie intake you’ll lose lean muscle and fat mass, but the more lean muscle mass you lose, the less metabolically active you are, so by having a high protein diet you’ll maintain your muscle, which means you’ll remain metabolically active and the weight loss will continue.”

  1. Eggs increase blood cholesterol levels = myth

“There used to be a belief that eggs increased your cholesterol level, but actually you make cholesterol within your own body so if you have a very high fat diet and you are prone to high cholesterol, you will make it anyway. Eggs themselves are not contributing to high cholesterol.”

  1. Your body can adapt to fat or protein as its primary energy fuel = truth

“It can and I do help ultra runners with fat adaptation, but we never ever take carbs out entirely; we periodise their intake. So if they’re going to do a track session, they will still have carbs in their diet. Your body will always use carbohydrate preferentially as fuel and it will use it a lot quicker and lot easier so you’ll be able to maintain a higher pace. It’s the fuel you tend to need in a race or high intensity session. But if you’re going out for a long slow run where you’re not worried about the pace, by all means do it fasted or without carbs in your system – so for example rather than eggs on toast you’d have eggs and avocado, or something similar. Eating in this way makes you become better at utilising fat as fuel. We all have huge stores of fat within us, no matter how thin a person is, and we become better at using that fat as fuel. So when you go into a race situation where you are taking on carbs, although you will use carbs as fuel, your body will also be burning a higher percentage of fat than normal because it’s got used to using fat as fuel as well.

“As yet, however, there is no study to prove that a high protein or a high fat diet actually improves performance – they’ve done studies to show that you can use protein and fat as a source of fuel, but there hasn’t been a study so far which has tracked performance. So far, all the scientists have said that periodising your carb intake according to when you need it can help your body to learn to use fat stores for fuel. It can be hard at first for your body to get used to, but your body does adapt.”

  1. Gluten-free foods are healthier = myth

“For some people a gluten-free diet is essential, but others eat gluten-free because they think it’s healthier. But recent studies have found that a gluten-free diet when you don’t need it doesn’t benefit you in any way so there’s really no point in doing it unless you need to. Some people say they feel bloated after a bowl of pasta or bread and they blame it on the gluten, but the thing that most people don’t realise is that for every gram of carbohydrate you have in your body, you tend to store 1-4 grams of fluid as well so you do tend to feel fuller. That doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve got an intolerance to it – it can just mean you’re holding more water, and to a certain degree that’s good because it will make you feel fuller. And if you eliminate anything you don’t need to from your diet, your body will struggle a little when you introduce it in the future.”


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May 17, 2018 at 9:05 am

Race news  |  The 2019 race

Early bird entry closing soon!

Keen to join us on race day next year? Our early bird window will be closing very soon so don’t leave it too late to sign up.

The race date for 2019 is 24th February, so once again we’ll be one of the first half marathons on the running calendar and a perfect training run if you’re planning to run a Spring marathon.

We’re delighted to welcome back The Grand as our headline sponsor again for the 2019 race, and it promises to be another race to remember!

Get inspired with our 2018 race day video…


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February 26, 2018 at 5:27 pm

All news

Aches & pains after race day? Get £10 off with Sundial

Relieve race day aches & pains with our massage partner Sundial.

Congratulations on completing The Grand Brighton Half Marathon on Sunday – despite the chill!

You may be feeling a bit stiff today in which case further massage here at Sundial can improve your recovery. A long run can cause muscles to tighten and shorten and massage works to elongate the muscles, relieve muscle tightness and restore joint range of motion.

Another benefit of post-run massage is to improve circulation. This helps improve tissue healing as more blood circulation means more nutrients to the muscles which reduces soreness and fatigue. The effects are cumulative too, so several therapeutic massages spaced a few days a part brings big benefits.

Sometimes in spite of massage and other post-run activities like stretching and foam rolling the soreness persists. This can be a sign of a deeper injury in which case our physio, James, can help.

​Although our laser is also great at reducing muscle soreness a sure sign that you might need a check with James might be if the pain is around a joint and worsens with weight bearing and movement. Normal post-run muscle soreness tends to improve through the day with gentle activity but this will tend to aggravate a more serious joint or muscle problem.

If you are having back pain or neck pain then a check up with one of our chiropractors might be worthwhile. Sometimes running can irritate and stiffen the spinal or pelvic joints especially if your back and core muscles aren’t as strong as they should be. Chiropractic can improve spinal flexibility with gentle joint techniques.

If you have post run aches and pains and some help, then give us a call – we will advise whether you need massage, physiotherapy or chiropractic. Everyone who ran on Sunday can claim a £10 discount off a session here at Sundial.


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February 17, 2018 at 4:02 pm

Race news

Free dessert or cocktail at GB1 for BHM runners

After months of training and staying clear of life’s indulgences, head to GB1 restaurant in The Grand for a treat you deserve!

When enjoying two courses in GB1, choose either a cocktail or dessert and it’s on us! Show your server a picture of you with your medal to qualify. See T&Cs below.

 

Terms & Conditions:

One free dessert or cocktail per marathon runner. Diners must order at least two courses in GB1 to qualify. Not available when dining from the set lunch menu or any other set menus/promotional offers.  Medal must be shown to qualify. Other terms and conditions may apply. Offer ends on 9th March 2018. 

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January 19, 2018 at 4:50 pm

Race news

3 secrets to prevent running injuries

James Masterton, physiotherapist at Sundial Clinics, shares his three secrets to prevent running injuries – and explains how to save £50 off Sundial’s Runners Training Package for Brighton Half runners.

As a keen runner myself, I know that running injuries are extremely common. However, being a physio, I also know the best way to prevent these injuries and how to recover quickly if I do get injured. Here at Sundial we believe we have the secrets for staying injury free and we would love to share these with you…

Gait analysis:

Getting the basics right should be the starting point for any runner.  Assessing your footwear and taking some video footage of your running style can help eliminate poor movement patterns and training error that may lead to injury.

Physiotherapy assessment:

Understanding past and present injuries, training plans and personal goals is a great way of preventing injury and helping you to stay on track with your training.  A physio assessment will help to highlight range of movement, postural and strength issues that could have a negative effect on your running.

Sports massage:

Massage is a great way to improve flexibility and avoid muscle fatigue. A regular massage will allow you to train more efficiently and help you to recover quicker.

Now that you know the secrets, here’s the Runners Training Package available at Sundial:

1 hour physiotherapy assessment including video gait analysis:

  • A full review of your current and past injuries, medical history, weekly exercise/training plans and personal goals
  • A full physical examination assessing current injuries, balance, range of movement, flexibility and strength
  • A series of videos on the treadmill to assess your running gait
  • Advice on how to address any identified issues, including a personalised exercise programme.

30 minute physiotherapy follow up session:

  • A review of your current exercise programme
  • Further examination of your current injuries or niggles
  • A progression and guidance of your current exercises
  • Advice on how best to warm up, cool down, stretching and foam rolling.

1 hour sports massage with the Sundial massage team:

  • A tailored sports massage to target those pre or post run aching muscles
  • To be used at anytime during your training or post race.

The normal value of these combined treatments is £149. The Sundial Runners Training Package is a bargain at £99, saving you a massive £50! (All sessions included in this package can be used anytime between the 1st of January and the 30th of September 2018).

To enquire about this offer or make an appointment, please call Sundial Clinics on either 01273 774 114 or 01273 696 414.

 


Article by

January 11, 2018 at 2:19 pm

Race news

Are you set for race day?

Brighton Half 2018 is creeping up fast. From planning your travel arrangements to eating a runner-friendly diet, don’t leave it too late to get set for race day. Here are some pointers for getting race day ready.

Plan your travel arrangements now

Brighton is well connected but we advise you to get ahead and check your travel arrangements now. We recommend you arrive at race village for 8am: the race start is 9am. Trains to the city are often subject to engineering works at weekends, so please do check you can arrive on time to ensure you can drop off baggage and find your start pen in good time. We are aware that the London-Brighton line is subject to works on the weekend of the race, so please do check Southern Railway’s information on planned improvement works.

If you plan to drive by car, Brighton gets very busy on race day and parking in the city can prove difficult. We run a Park & Ride service, which this year has two locations. You can book this in our Shop. Note that in previous years, Park & Ride has sold out, so we recommend you book early.

Give your body some TLC

With the high mileage weeks creeping up, take care and listen to your body. Try to get enough sleep and eat well, with a balanced diet geared for running. Maintenance sports massage will help to prevent any niggles getting worse and treat your body to a little TLC when it needs it most. Our physio and sports massage partner Sundial Clinics have locations in Brighton and London and often run deals for Brighton Half runners.

Book a race day massage

Treat weary limbs to a massage on race day through our brilliant physio and sports massage partner Sundial Clinics. You can book both pre and post-race massage, bookable in our online Shop.

Get set for the high mileage weeks in training

If you need a steer with your training as we head into the high mileage weeks, take a look at our training page. Our wonderful training partner RunBrighton organise weekly training runs, which can really help with motivation on cold weekend mornings when you need to put in some mileage (the group is also a great way to meet other runners). We also partner with Mbition, which create bespoke online training plans to help you train well for the half marathon distance.

Enjoy the final few weeks of training!


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January 8, 2018 at 3:00 pm

Charity news  |  Race news

Charity of the Week: Chestnut Tree House

Support your local children’s hospice in their 15th birthday year – join #TeamChestnut today!

Chestnut Tree House is the children’s hospice for East and West Sussex, Brighton & Hove, and South East Hampshire and cares for 300 children and young adults.

Since opening in 2003, they have provided specialist palliative care to babies, children and young people with progressive life-shortening conditions and support for their families – both at the hospice and in families’ own homes.

Chestnut Tree House helps families live For the Now. They are the hand that reassures, a hug that comforts, a safe port in a sea of life-changing diagnoses and round-the-clock care.

Now is precious moments that give a lifetime of memories, the chance to be a parent for a few hours, rather than a carer, and the opportunity for kids to just be kids, to do all the things that kids their age should do. Now is all about exploring, creating, enjoying and treasuring. And for supporters it’s all about the high of doing something important, something that they didn’t think they could do. It’s about making their own memories whilst making a difference.

Chestnut Tree House children’s hospice is celebrating its 15th birthday this year, and they want to encourage people of all ages across Sussex and South East Hampshire to take on a challenge to mark the occasion, live For the Now and help them to continue caring for local life-limited children and families.

So make this a year for taking on a challenge. For crossing the finish line. For yourself. For local families. For living. For the Now.

Make your half marathon count – join the Chestnut Tree House 15th birthday team today!

Watch the video below to find out more about our work and read more on the Chestnut Tree House website: www.chestnut-tree-house.org.uk/brightonhalf

Sign up for a Chestnut Tree House place now >>


Article by

December 7, 2017 at 5:29 pm

Charity news  |  Race news

Charity of the Week: RISE

 

We don’t for a minute under-estimate the hard-work, sacrifice, chafing and blisters it takes to complete a 13 mile run… which is why we’re so grateful to each and every amazing person who chooses to run for us!

One of our runners in last year’s event said: “It made such a massive difference running for a charity that were really kind and felt like you valued our efforts. RISE takes on such an important role keeping the community safe from domestic abuse, but it was really admirable how much you also managed to take care of me and the other runners today. It was a privilege to run for you.”

In the lead up to the race another runner was given a £10 donation at a local community meeting in Brighton, by someone who said that RISE had helped her leave an abusive situation and start a new life. Our lovely runner decided to carry this £10 note in her pocket during the race, to give her motivation when she started feeling tired at mile 10!

Whether you’ve got your own place or are looking for a charity to run for we’d love you to join Team RISE. In return we’ll give you:

  • Access to support and running seminars through for FREE via our brilliant partners Studio 57.
  • A fabulous goody-bag overflowing with treats (all kindly donated from an array of awesome local companies).
  • Access to the RISE tent in the athlete’s village on race day for you, your friends and family. Our tent promises to be awash with all the cake you can eat, and plenty of hugs.
  • You also get a fetching hot pink running vest to make you stand out to our teams of cheer squads who will be encouraging Team RISE runners on their way around the 13 mile course.

A staggering 1 in 4 women will be affected by domestic abuse in their lifetime, but RISE believes that no-one should live in fear of abuse and violence. With the help of our supporters RISE is able to offer the following support to residents of Brighton & Hove:

  • The only local domestic abuse helpline
  • A refuge with room for 15 families in urgent need
  • An LGB&T service for survivors of domestic abuse, which was the first in England
  • Support with criminal and civil proceedings
  • Counselling and support groups
  • Housing and finance information and solicitors appointments

Register here >>