Race Day 2020

23 February

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December 5, 2019 at 3:17 pm

All news  |  Brighton Half Marathon 2020  |  Charity news  |  Race news

Charity of the Week: The Sussex Beacon

 


Run with Team Beacon and support the charity behind The Grand Brighton Half Marathon!

Over the last four years of The Grand Brighton Half Marathon, Team Beacon has rapidly grown. Thanks to their dedicated support and generosity, we have been able to provide specialist care and support to many people living with HIV.

2019 was another big year for Team Beacon, as we provided extra special and exclusive facilities in the race village for our runners for a second year to maximize the race day experience for Team Beacon. We were thrilled to meet our runners, to celebrate with them as they proudly posed with their medals for free professional photos and to congratulate them with well-deserved sweet treats and hot soup.

Due to the fantastic feedback and rocketing Team Beacon sign up numbers for the 2019 race, our team are busy working on an even better marquee for our dedicated runners and supporters. Our spectacular Team Beacon marquee promises to deliver an exclusive baggage area, warming and delicious catering, photographer, comfy seating, motivational music, post-race reception and much more – all in one place in the race village! Thanks to our loyal sponsor Glencairn Consulting Ltd, our runners will also receive their technical Team Beacon running vest straight to their door, so they can train proudly in their team colours. Fundraising resources, competitions, training runs and race day information is just a few taps away with our Team Beacon Facebook Group, where runners can ask questions and share training tips.

The Sussex Beacon needs you!

Over 100,000 people live with HIV in the UK, a number which increases every day. With daily medication people living with HIV can lead normal lives, however many suffer with psychological effects and HIV-related illnesses, such as cancer and dementia. The complex combination of HIV and related illnesses require specialist treatment. Brighton has the 2nd highest HIV prevalence in the UK, and access to specialist care and support is vital. With a 10-bed inpatient unit, The Sussex Beacon provides 24 hour medical and psychological care to people struggling with a new diagnosis, starting new medication, recovering from HIV-related cancer treatment and dementia, requiring family services and end of life care. Most of all, it provides a safe, comforting place for patients in their time of need. You can help us continue to offer support to those who need it most.

Click here to find out more and join Team Beacon

 


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November 7, 2019 at 3:39 pm

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The Active for Life Running Challenge youth programme

The Sussex Beacon, the charity behind the Brighton Half Marathon, have been working in partnership with Active for Life on their annual Running Challenge programme for several years. The programme offers reduced entry into our Brighton Half Youth Races, a fun, one-mile race aimed at children of all abilities aged 7-17.

The Active for Life Running Challenge programme supports children in Y3-Y6 to train and participate in The Brighton Half Youth Race and the Mini Mile; two prestigious local running events.

The goal is to set yourself a challenge to run your personal best at both races.

The Active for Life team work with local schools to target those children who are the least active and /or would like the opportunity to get involved with the Running Challenge to help boost their confidence and self-esteem through physical activity. It also helps with getting the young people active and achieving their Active 60 Minutes a day and hopefully also inspiring their families to get involved too.

The project is run by Brighton & Hove City Council, Healthy Lifestyles team, to support people in the city to lead active lifestyles. Active for Life has grown into a city-wide initiative which reaches out to thousands of Brighton & Hove residents every year, supporting them to become more active, more often.

To find out more about Running Challenge email Vanessa.lynham@brighton-hove.gov.uk

“My grandson joined Active for Life after discussions with school and his physiotherapist at Seaside view. He suffers from DCD and his mobility is challenging for him at times. He had little confidence to join in sports as he had low self-esteem around his size and ‘clumsiness’ as he described it. We encouraged him to give it a go and see how he felt after a couple of sessions.

“You have all been very supportive with encouraging him that it’s all about the taking part and not the competitiveness.  He has achieved so much more self-esteem since he began, although it’s a work in progress. He was so proud of himself after completing his Youth Race and didn’t stop telling everyone and showing his medal off. He is really looking forward to completing his next run in April and getting another medal for his collection.”

 

“My daughter’s participation in the AFL Running Challenge has hugely raised her self-confidence and self-esteem. Being able to find a platform where her skills and abilities are rewarded and acknowledged away from academic success, has undoubtedly built on her own self-worth and her understanding that we all have skills in different areas.

“The running challenge enables her to shine, and challenge herself, away from the pressures of academia. For all learners, like my daughter, I think this is vital in building their resilience and self-confidence at a time when pressures on young people from social media etc are at an all-time high. 

“I also feel that the team spirit involved in the training and on the day of events is a wonderful and rewarding experience for all of them. They are able to bond over their experiences, positive and negative and support each other’s involvement. It’s not just about winning but about taking part and supporting each other, regardless of ability.”


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at 3:11 pm

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Take a sneak peek at our anniversary medal

Drum roll please… we’re delighted to reveal the special medal for our 30th anniversary race on 23rd February. We don’t know about you, but it’s got us very excited about race day next year!

If you haven’t yet entered but want one of these bling beauties, enter soon as we’re getting close to sell out for general entries. Once we sell out, we never re-open the race so this is your last chance.

 


Team Beacon 2019
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September 9, 2019 at 9:23 am

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Glencairn Consulting returns as Team Beacon Sponsor

The Sussex Beacon are celebrating a staggering 30 years of the Brighton Half Marathon in 2020. Most importantly, 30 years of support from local businesses and thousands of volunteers who make this event and Team Beacon possible.

The Grand Brighton Half Marathon is our biggest fundraiser. Owned and delivered by The Sussex Beacon, the event raises essential funds for our services for people living with HIV. Within the 12,000 annual entrants are a team of runners going the extra mile by fundraising for The Sussex Beacon. We call these incredible people ‘Team Beacon’. Over the last 4 years, 750 Team Beacon runners raised an astonishing £105,000 with support from family and friends.

Our Team Beacon Sponsor

We are proud to provide Team Beacon with fantastic facilities, hospitality and support on race day to give every runner the best experience. This wouldn’t be possible without one very special supporter who goes above and beyond to support The Sussex Beacon.

Andrew Buchan, IT Architect and Director at Glencairn Consulting, is generously sponsoring Team Beacon 2020! Supporting the charity and every runner who is testing their limits by running 13.1 miles for The Sussex Beacon.

Glencairn Consulting are an independent IT consulting company providing Enterprise Architecture services to companies across financial, public, private and charity sectors. They specialise in major change programs and above all bring years of experience delivering new technologies in cost saving delivery methodologies. Andrew very generously supports a variety of good causes any way he can. 

Andrew is a keen runner himself and advocates the physical and mental benefits of running.

There is nothing better than to go out for an early morning run and let problems resolve through the run. Running in groups and events are a great method of pushing your limits to get to the next goal. For me it’s about pushing yourself to achieve a better time than before. Whilst also enjoying the atmosphere and fun in running”

Why The Grand Brighton Half Marathon?

We are always blown away by Andrews commitment to running and supporting local charities in the process. Andrew has completed many challenge events, and we’re delighted The Grand Brighton Half Marathon remains on his yearly running calendar.

The Brighton Half is a great course and a good starting point for half marathon events. The support along the route is great and you feel encouraged all the way. The location is perfect with a near flat course (albeit a slight incline on first leg). It is a great feeling running along Madeira Drive and finishing knowing you have achieved a goal and made a huge impact on charities like The Sussex Beacon as a result. The Sussex Beacon is a great charity to support and one of my favourites. Team Beacon is a great place to join and become part of a huge running team with encouragement all the way, a private tent for preparing and relaxing in after the event, plus free food to re-charge the batteries.

We asked Andrew to tell us his favourite thing about The Grand Brighton Half Marathon – and we definitely agree!

“The atmosphere. No matter what the weather, the streets are crowded with supporters and it’s an amazing feeling crossing the line knowing what you have achieved personally and for charities.”

Supporting The Sussex Beacon

Andrew has been a supporter and volunteer at The Sussex Beacon for many years. A vital part of the team, he always goes above and beyond to support the organisation any way he can.

“I have been personally involved with the Sussex Beacon for about 5 years now and as a HIV Positive man, I know the services they provide are vital to our community. Not only in Brighton but the surrounding areas too. The team provide valuable services to anyone affected by HIV and are fully supportive and inclusive. Sponsoring Team Beacon allows me to give something back to The Sussex Beacon. Helping to raise awareness of their cause whilst encouraging runners to join Team Beacon.”

We are incredibly fortunate for Andrew’s invaluable support. Without ongoing supporters and volunteers like Andrew and Glencairn Consulting, we simply wouldn’t exist.

If you would like to join Team Beacon, please visit the Team Beacon page for full details or register via the ‘Enter 2020’ button. If you would like to volunteer for The Sussex Beacon or support the charity in other ways however, please visit The Sussex Beacon website.


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August 21, 2019 at 9:57 am

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Meet our first place winner from 30 years ago

Brighton Half celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2020 and as part of the celebrations, we’ve been taking a jaunt down memory lane. We were lucky enough to meet the first ever winner of the race back in 1990 –  David Knight.

David Knight at our launch night with wife Mandi

What was your winning time back in that very first Brighton Half in 1990?

I think about 1hr 7mins.

Was there a prize for winning the race?
A medal and £25 vouchers I think.

Do you recall who came second and third that first year?
I’m not sure the first year, but in the second year the second runner was Mike Smith, but there was a bit of drama as even though I beat him by 4mins 45secs, because I entered on the day, I wasn’t allowed the first medal – they gave it to him! (See the news cutting at the foot of the blog).

What was the route for that first race?
It started at the Marina and ran along the undercliff then back on ourselves on the top road – Marine Parade. After that I can’t remember!

Do you recall how many runners took part?
There was about 400-450.

How did you find out about the race – was it very much a club event back then?
I ran for Brighton & Hove Athletics Club, and was invited to run by Ron Grover of Arena 80.

Were there many people watching?
Sam Lambourn cycled in front with me, but there were only really people at the finish. None of the roads were closed back then.

Have you carried on running in the 30 years since?
Yes little bits – I stopped in 1995 as my wife was very ill fighting cancer, but she’s fine now. At the time I was sponsored by Adidas.

Do you think the running industry has changed much over the 30 years?
There is bigger prize money, which has brought more elite runners from all over the world. And because of the fitness boom, there are a lot more runners doing it to keep fit and healthy.

Do you know if people ran for charities in races back in the early 1990s?
Yes they did.

out on the first place medal because race rules disallowed his 'on the day entry'.

A press cutting from The Argus in 1991 after David Knight missed out on the first place medal because race rules disallowed his ‘on the day entry’.

 

 


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February 26, 2018 at 5:27 pm

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Aches & pains after race day? Get £10 off with Sundial

Relieve race day aches & pains with our massage partner Sundial.

Congratulations on completing The Grand Brighton Half Marathon on Sunday – despite the chill!

You may be feeling a bit stiff today in which case further massage here at Sundial can improve your recovery. A long run can cause muscles to tighten and shorten and massage works to elongate the muscles, relieve muscle tightness and restore joint range of motion.

Another benefit of post-run massage is to improve circulation. This helps improve tissue healing as more blood circulation means more nutrients to the muscles which reduces soreness and fatigue. The effects are cumulative too, so several therapeutic massages spaced a few days a part brings big benefits.

Sometimes in spite of massage and other post-run activities like stretching and foam rolling the soreness persists. This can be a sign of a deeper injury in which case our physio, James, can help.

​Although our laser is also great at reducing muscle soreness a sure sign that you might need a check with James might be if the pain is around a joint and worsens with weight bearing and movement. Normal post-run muscle soreness tends to improve through the day with gentle activity but this will tend to aggravate a more serious joint or muscle problem.

If you are having back pain or neck pain then a check up with one of our chiropractors might be worthwhile. Sometimes running can irritate and stiffen the spinal or pelvic joints especially if your back and core muscles aren’t as strong as they should be. Chiropractic can improve spinal flexibility with gentle joint techniques.

If you have post run aches and pains and some help, then give us a call – we will advise whether you need massage, physiotherapy or chiropractic. Everyone who ran on Sunday can claim a £10 discount off a session here at Sundial.


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June 22, 2017 at 9:22 am

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10 ways to tackle hayfever and stay running

Struck down with a streaming nose and itchy eyes? Here are ten tips to stay running when you have hayfever.

“If I don’t manage my hay fever carefully, it can seriously affect my performance on the track,” GB athlete Marlon Devonish says. Despite having symptoms on the more severe side of the scale, the sprinter explains how he hasn’t let hayfever rule his life and he highlights how, when managed carefully, sport can continue when the summer sniffles strike.

Hayfever is a type of allergic rhinitis caused by an overreaction of the body’s immune system to pollen. It causes inflammation inside the nose and it can affect the sinuses, eyes and throat too. Around 20-25% of us suffer from it in the UK, one of the highest prevalence rates in the world, and you’re more likely to suffer from it if you have a history of asthma or eczema in your family. While there are medications to alleviate the symptoms on the market, there are ways to help yourself too. Here are ten tips to keep symptoms under control.

1. Keep an eye on the pollen level
Make it part of your early morning routine to watch the pollen forecast on TV or check the pollen count online before you head outdoors. There are also pollen count apps which can warn you when it’s a particularly high pollen day in your area. Typically most people get symptoms when the pollen count is over 50, though it varies between individuals. The pollen forecast is typically calculated as:

Low: fewer than 30 grains of pollen in every cubic metre of air

Moderate: 30-49 grains of pollen in every cubic metre of air

High: 50-149 grains of pollen in every cubic metre of air

Very high: 150 or more grains of pollen in every cubic metre of air

2. Work out which pollens you’re allergic to
Different plants release their pollen into the atmosphere at different times of the year so you can sometimes work out what triggers your symptoms and take steps to avoid your nasal nemesis. The vast majority of us – 95% – are allergic to grass pollen, and 25% to tree pollens such as ash, birch and oak. Take a look at the interactive pollen timeline on the Benadryl website to see what trees and grasses pollenate when. Typically:

Tree pollen is earlier in the year, starting in March

Grass pollen is June – August

Weed pollen is released any time from early spring to late autumn.

3. Avoid busy, built-up roads
With fewer green spaces, it might seem strange that hayfever is twice as common in cities than in the country but the answer lies in air pollution. Fumes from cars can trigger or aggravate symptoms so main roads are best avoided. Parks are potent with pollen too so give these a wide berth. So where can you run if your usual stomping ground is off limits? Research shows that air pollution drops significantly 300 metres away from main roads so plan your running routes wisely and choose less built up areas. If you live in London, try running along the Thames path where lower air pollution and reduced pollen will ease symptoms.

4. Make a beeline for the beach
If you’re lucky enough to live by the sea, you’re in a perfect spot to beat streaming eyes. Coastal areas typically have lower levels of air pollution because sea breezes blow the pollen inland.

5. Wash away the pollen
Pollen is pesky. It gets everywhere, sticking to your skin and hair and clinging to clothing. Get into a habit of showering and washing your running gear after every run and avoid drying your washing on a clothes-line outside.

6. Run at lunchtime
Plants release pollen early in the morning and late in the afternoon yet these are often the most common times we choose to run, so you may have to shuffle your running schedule around to suit lower pollen levels. During the daytime pollen levels are usually at their lowest from roughly 11 – 4pm so try running at lunchtime.

7. Wear sports sunglasses
If you suffer from itchy eyes, sunglasses will be prove useful, helping to prevent pollen coming into contact with the eye area while you’re running. Wrap-around designs are especially effective.

8. Apply Vaseline to other areas
Besides combating chafing, runner’s best friend Vaseline has another use in the summer by helping to combat pollen. Apply petroleum jelly or an equivalent balm around the edge of each nostril to trap or block pollens from entering your nose and preventing a reaction. Be careful of sunburn though!

9. Invest in an air filter for indoors
If you find your sleep is affected, a good air filter can help. Choose a filter which is proven to trap small particles.

10. On high pollen days…
All is not lost: there’s always the indoor treadmill as a last resort.


Article by

at 9:14 am

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5 tips to stay comfortable on summer runs

Running on cool nights and refuelling on ice-cream is what summer running is all about. Stay comfortable on the run with our running tips for the season.

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate
The higher the mercury level soars the more you’ll sweat, the more fluid you lose and the more you’ll need to drink to replace lost fluids. When you sweat you lose salts too and these are vital for muscle function so it’s important to hydrate with electrolytes and not just water. Electrolytes feature in isotonic sports drinks, or you can avoid extra calories from sugary carbohydrates if you choose electrolyte tabs, which you simply pop into water.

Heed overheating warning signs
Overheating can be dangerous. Be aware of the warning signs that tell you something is not right. If you feel ill with a headache or dizziness, have hot and cold flushes, feel confused or seem to be over-sweating more than you should be, stop running, find some shade, hydrate and get a lift home.

Always arm yourself with suncream
A summer essential but not an accessory we’re used to taking on runs in the UK. Buy sweat-resistant (labelled water resistant) sprays or creams to make sure it stays put and apply it liberally all over your body to avoid sun damage. The smaller sunblock sticks are great to pop into small pockets in running gear and you’ll be less likely to forget sunscreen if you keep it in there.

Watch for ticks on the trail
Lyme disease is a tick-borne infectious disease carried by animals such as mice and deer which live in woodland areas. If you run in forest, woodland or heath areas it’s wise to be cautious of areas of exposed skin where ticks could latch on. Public Health England estimates there are 2,000 to 3,000 cases of Lyme disease in England and Wales each year. If you love running through longer grasses and getting in the thick of the trail it’s easy to protect yourself by choosing long tights rather than shorts or capris.

Wear cooling gear
Avoiding clammy cotton tees and picking running gear made from technical fabric is even more important in summer when you sweat more. Look for moisture-wicking, breathable fabrics that are designed to stay cool as the temperature rises.