Race Day 2020

23 February

Tag archives for: brighton half marathon

Brighton Half Marathon: 2 Weeks To Go

Tapering Your Training

It’s time to start the all-important final aspect of your training: tapering.

Whilst it may seem counter-intuitive, tapering is essential to preventing injury before the big day, and ensuring you perform at your very best. So, try to keep your excitement under control, and resist the urge to train like mad, as the countdown begins!

What is tapering?

The taper period is when you reduce the intensity of your training as the half marathon approaches, to allow your body to properly recover and adjust. Each runner’s requirements will differ, and the person with whom you develop your training plan will help you plan the most effective taper period for your body.

Why is tapering important?

Tapering can dramatically reduce your risk of sustaining an injury during the race and prevent problems during your recovery period too.

During your taper period, your muscle glycogen levels return to their optimal level. Various enzymes, hormones and antioxidants, which are depleted during training, also return to their peak levels, and muscle and connective tissue is given chance to repair and strengthen in time for race day. Tapering also allows your immune system to improve dramatically after the strain of training.

The tapering period is also when your body will reap the benefits of training. The ways in which your performance improves through training are called ‘training adaptations’ and require a certain amount of rest to take place. This means that while you may not be working as hard during your taper, it’s an essential step towards being at your fittest and fastest by the time race day comes around.

Science for maximum performance

With your hard training done and your tapering period about to begin, there’s every chance you’re already keeping to a strict diet to ensure maximum performance – but have you considered how you’ll stay hydrated and energized during the race? Runners Need has a wide range of nutrition and hydration foods and supplements to keep your blood sugar levels at peak and prevent the dreaded flagging. Visit our in-store experts to find the on-the-go products guaranteed to help you power through!


Brighton Half Marathon: 6 Weeks to Go

Avoid injury with Runners Need

With the big day just six weeks away, nailing your half marathon training is essential to achieve your best performance effectively and painlessly! Scheduling in the right amount of hard training, easier runs and rest will ensure that your body is well prepared to power through the 13 miles. Our friends at Runners Need have put together a training guide to help you get the most from your last six weeks of training. Remember, though, this is only a guide, and you should always seek personalised training advice where possible.

Let’s start with the easy bit: every Monday, Thursday and Saturday for the last six weeks are rest days. It’s really important that you schedule in enough time for your body to recover, to ensure you don’t sustain any injuries and you are rested enough to perform at your best on race day.

Every Tuesday, you should do 40 minutes of easy running. This light exercise is intended to maintain your great results so far and keep your muscles moving, for an easy transition between hard training and rest days.

The first four Wednesdays of the six weeks leading up to the Brighton Half Marathon, you should do a 30-minute tempo run. A tempo run is one which is 25 to 30 seconds per mile quicker than your current race pace and improves speed and endurance in longer races like a half marathon. The last two Wednesdays (in our case, 13th and 20th February) should be rest days – this is your taper period.

Fridays and Sundays are where we alter the run types and lengths for maximum gain as the half marathon draws closer:

Fridays:

Week 1 (w/c 14th Jan) – 40 minutes interval running

Week 2 – 50 minutes interval running or cross training

Week 3 – 50 minutes interval running

Week 4 – 40 minutes interval running or cross training

Week 5 – 40 minutes interval running

Week 6 – 50 minutes easy running

Sundays:

Week 1 – Run 5 miles (8km)

Week 2 –Run 10 miles (16km)

Week 3 – Run 5 miles (8km)

Week 4 – Run 12 miles (19km)

Week 5 – Run 6 miles (10km) at race pace

Week 6 – Run the Brighton Half Marathon!

Following this training plan, or a similar one recommended for you, will ensure that your body is in the best possible condition for the race. From Runners Need, the very best of luck to everyone participating in the Brighton Half Marathon!


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January 7, 2019 at 11:21 am

Charity news  |  Race news  |  The 2019 race

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Charity of the Week: Macmillan

Being told ‘you have cancer’ can affect so much more than your health – it can also affect your familyyour job, even your ability to pay the bills. But you’re still you. Macmillan get that. And, after over 100 years of helping people through cancer, we get what’s most important: that you’re treated as a person, not just a patient. We’re here to help you find your best way through from the moment of diagnosis, so you’re able to live life as fully as you can.

Life with Cancer

Life doesn’t stop just because you’ve been diagnosed with cancer. Seeing friends, supporting family, and finding a way to pay the bills are still important, even if you’re living with a terminal diagnosis.

You may have cancer, but you are still you, with a life to lead, friends to see, family who need you and people to love. Because life with cancer is still life, and we will help you live it.

How you can help

With 2.5 million people currently living with cancer we need your support more than ever. By running and fundraising for Team Macmillan in the Brighton Half you will help us support even more people affected by cancer. JOIN US NOW!

In return we’ll support you every step of the way – our amazing runners receive:

  • A fundraising pack full of all the resources you need to smash your fundraising target
  • A free Team Macmillan technical running vest or t-shirt, plus iron on letters to customise your kit
  • Access to the Macmillan training zone to make sure you are fighting fit on race day
  • Newsletters to keep you up to date with Macmillan news and activities
  • The best support on race day from our world-famous cheer-points
  • Exclusive access to our hospitality marquee on race day with much needed refreshments and high fives a plenty.

So help us make history and smash our £130,000 fundraising target which could:

  • help run a large Macmillan information and support centre for a year
  • support our cancer support specialists run our Macmillan Support Line phone service for a week, answering 2,807 calls and emails from people who want questions answered, need practical or financial support, or just want to chat.
  • pay for a Macmillan nurse for three years, helping people living with cancer and their families receive essential medical, practical and emotional support.

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December 24, 2018 at 6:00 am

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Run for Chestnut Tree House and make every step count

Join Team Chestnut

 

At any time, Chestnut Tree House cares for around 300 children with life-shortening conditions, all of whom are unlikely to reach adulthood, by helping families at our hospice and in their own homes live For the Now.

Our 2019 Brighton Half Marathon team will raise vital funds and awareness of Chestnut Tree House and will significantly help our campaign to reach every life-limited child in East and West Sussex and South East Hampshire.

 

All our care is offered to families free of charge, which costs over £3.9million a year. We receive less than 7% of this from central government, so really do rely on amazing supporters like you to help us to continue to help more families live life to the full.

As a Chestnut Tree House runner, we’re with you all the way. By joining our team and committing to raise £200, you’ll get:

  • A bespoke Chestnut Tree House running vest.
  • Support along your training and fundraising journey.
  • Direct contact with our team of Chestnut Tree House runners.
  • A post-race reception with refreshments and massage.
  • A Team Chestnut cheer squad to encourage you on the course.

 

It takes more than you think to keep Chestnut Tree House going and your support makes a huge and real difference in the lives of children, young adults, and their families across Sussex.

  • £220: will allow a member of our Community Team to provide a few hours specialist nursing care in a child’s home, allowing the parents or carers to spend quality time together.
  • £285: will provide for one hour of all care services at Chestnut Tree House and in the community.
  • £675: will allow a child to spend a night at Chestnut Tree House, where they will receive specialist care from our nursing team and enjoy the hospice’s facilities.
  • £887: will allow a nurse to support a family immediately following bereavement, helping them to plan the funeral and to say their final goodbyes to their child.
  • £1,500: will allow our Community Team to host a Family Day for 20 families, providing a range of activities and information for the whole family to enjoy.
  • £1,953: will allow a child to spend a 3-night break at Chestnut Tree House where they will receive round the clock specialist care and symptom management from our nursing team, whilst mum and dad get the chance to “recharge their batteries”.

Join Team Chestnut. For yourself. For local families. For living. For making precious memories. For the Now.

If you have any questions about joining Team Chestnut or your fundraising, please feel free to call us anytime on 01903 706355, we are here to help you throughout your fundraising journey with us.


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December 17, 2018 at 1:44 pm

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Charity of the Week: Alzheimer’s Society

 

Dementia devastates lives. Together we can beat it.

Run for Alzheimer’s Society

By 2021, 1 million people will be living with the condition. But dementia won’t win. Until the day we find a cure, Alzheimer’s Society will be here for anyone affected by dementia – wherever they are, whatever they’re going through. Everything we do is informed and inspired by them.

Alzheimer’s Society is the UK’s leading dementia charity. We provide information and support, improve care, fund research, and create lasting change for people affected by dementia.

 

We know we can beat dementia, but we can’t do it alone.

We need you to run for us. We need your miles, your energy and your determination. We need you to help put an end to dementia.

When you run for us, you run with the support of a dedicated team.

  • Commit to a £250 fundraising target and we’ll work with you to reach it. We’ll send you newsletters full of top tips and are always at the end of the phone to talk ideas.
  • We know training is tough, but you’re tougher. We’ll make sure you have expert knowledge from our professional coaches RunningWithUs at your fingertips. They’ll be at your disposal throughout your journey and you’ll even get to meet the team at our free half marathon training day in February.
  • On the big day, you’ll give it your all and we’ll be there to shout your name from the rafters.
  • We’ll send you an Alzheimer’s Society running top to represent the team and a hero’s welcome will be waiting at our post-race marquee where you’ll be treated to hot drinks and refreshments.

 

By running the Brighton Half for us, we can continue to deliver ground-breaking research. Alzheimer’s Society is the only UK charity funding dementia research into a cure, cause, prevention and care.

£50 could help us investigate how one type of dementia develops by paying to grow one day’s worth of nerve cells in a lab.

£250 could accelerate the search for an effective treatment for vascular dementia by paying for a year’s worth of clinical trial drugs.

£380 could allow a researcher find out more about a specific type of dementia and how we might treat it by studying a person’s genes for a day.

£75 can pay for 20 microtome blades, used to create slices of the brain the thickness of a human hair. This enables researchers to study the intricate detail of brain cells, and the toxic proteins that cause dementia. This will give us a better knowledge of the causes of dementia so we can develop treatments that stop the condition in its tracks.

£100 could cover Alzheimer’s Society’s cost of supporting one patient with early stage Alzheimer’s for three months on one of our vital drug trials in our Drug Discovery Programme. This Programme could deliver new treatments for dementia faster and cheaper by repurposing drugs already in use for other health conditions.

£250 could pay for 100 microlitres of a special chemical that is applied to brain tissue, allowing researchers to study how brain cells are affected by the dementia. Without these resources our scientists can’t carry out their work which is bringing us closer to a cure. Without this chemical, achieving any results in the lab would be a huge struggle, pretty much impossible. Working out exactly what happens to brain cells in dementia, and how that damage starts, is critical to driving forward advances in dementia treatments and one day finding a cure.

Join the race. Beat dementia. Sign up to run the 2019 Grand Brighton Half Marathon for Alzheimer’s Society.

Get in touch

We always love hearing from you. Please contact the Running team events@alzheimers.org.uk or call 0330 333 0804 if you have any questions at all. We hope to welcome you to the team soon!

 


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December 9, 2018 at 5:00 am

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Run with Team Beacon and support the charity behind The Grand Brighton Half Marathon!

Run with Team Beacon and support the charity behind The Grand Brighton Half Marathon!

Over the last three years of The Grand Brighton Half Marathon, Team Beacon has rapidly grown with 600 runners fundraising over £86,000 for The Sussex Beacon. Thanks to their dedicated support and generosity, we have been able to provide specialist care and support to many people living with HIV.

2018 was a big year for Team Beacon, as we provided extra special and exclusive facilities in the race village for our runners to maximize the race day experience for Team Beacon. We were thrilled to meet our runners, to celebrate with them as they proudly posed with their medals for free professional photos and to congratulate them with well-deserved sweet treats and hot soup.

Check out the feedback from our 2018 Team Beacon here.

Due to the fantastic feedback and rocketing Team Beacon sign up numbers for the 2019 race, our team are busy working on an even better marquee for our dedicated runners and supporters. Our spectacular Team Beacon marquee promises to deliver an exclusive baggage area, warming and delicious catering, photographer, comfy seating, motivational music, post-race reception and much more – all in one place in the race village! Thanks to our loyal sponsor Glencairn Consulting Ltd, our runners will also receive their technical Team Beacon running vest straight to their door, so they can train proudly in their team colours. Fundraising resources, competitions, training runs and race day information is just a few taps away with our Team Beacon Facebook Group, where runners can ask questions and share training tips. All runners will be supported by our Challenge Events Fundraiser from the moment they sign up, to the moment they receive their personalised celebratory certificate in March 2019.

The Sussex Beacon needs you!

Over 101,000 people live with HIV in the UK, a number which increases every day. With daily medication people living with HIV can lead normal lives, however many suffer with psychological effects and HIV-related illnesses, such as cancer and dementia. The complex combination of HIV and related illnesses require specialist treatment. Brighton has the 2nd highest HIV prevalence in the UK, and access to specialist care and support is vital. With a 10-bed inpatient unit, The Sussex Beacon provides 24 hour medical and psychological care to people struggling with a new diagnosis, starting new medication, recovering from HIV-related cancer treatment and dementia, requiring family services and end of life care. Most of all, it provides a safe, comforting place for patients in their time of need. You can help us continue to offer support to those who need it most.

If you would like to be a part of Team Beacon and experience a race day like no other, find out more and secure your place now.


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November 29, 2018 at 4:54 pm

Charity news  |  Race news  |  The 2019 race

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Meet the charity behind the event

 

The Brighton Half Marathon celebrates its 29th birthday on race day 2019 – but did you know the race is a charity event, organised by local HIV charity The Sussex Beacon? As World Aids Day approaches on 1st December, find out about the local charity behind a very big race.

The Grand Brighton Half Marathon is The Sussex Beacon’s largest fundraising event each year, where we welcome 12,000 runners and thousands of spectators to celebrate running in the city. Unbeknownst to many, The Sussex Beacon has been involved in the event since its early days in the 1990s.

The Sussex Beacon cause

Brighton has the 2nd highest HIV prevalence in the UK, and access to specialist care and support is vital. With a 10-bed inpatient unit, The Sussex Beacon provides 24 hour medical and psychological care to people struggling with a new diagnosis, starting new medication, recovering from HIV-related cancer treatment and dementia, requiring family services and end of life care. Most of all, it provides a safe, comforting place for patients in their time of need.

Over 100,000 people live with HIV in the UK, a number which increases every day. With daily medication people living with HIV can lead normal lives, however many suffer with psychological effects and HIV-related illnesses, such as cancer and dementia. The complex combination of HIV and related illnesses require specialist treatment.

World Aids Day

Saturday 1st December marks World AIDS Day, a day dedicated to raising awareness of HIV/AIDS. It’s an opportunity for our community (and the world!) to unite in the fight against HIV, to remember those who have died, and to show our support for those living with HIV today.

Show your support

The Sussex Beacon has its own running team in the event – Team Beacon. If you already have a general race place you can also fundraise for the charity as an ‘own place runner‘- every little amount of fundraising really does help. You could also show your support on race day by rocking a red ribbon on your race kit.

Find out more about the wider work of The Sussex Beacon on the charity’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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July 26, 2018 at 2:49 pm

Charity news  |  Race news  |  The 2019 race

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10 reasons to run for charity


Ever considered running for charity? Here are 10 reasons to use your run for good.

1. Raise funds for a cause close to your heart

Using a personal challenge to raise funds for a good cause that you truly care about is an amazing thing. A few pounds from your family and friends  can quickly mount up and help a good cause. You could be funding medical treatment for a person in need, a day out for a poorly child, a help line for vulnerable people, access to water for children without, animals who need protection, life-saving medical research, emotional support for people undergoing treatment or psychological support for people with mental health issues. If you are signing up to run an event, you have the opportunity to share your achievements with others who truly need it.

2. Raise awareness of the charity

Money is not all that is important for charities. Runners will often wear a charity vest provided by their chosen charity, many of you will set up a JustGiving page and a lot of you will share your journey on your multiple social media channels. For every person who sees your challenge, someone is learning about the charity and their cause. Raising awareness can be just as key as raising funds, and this awareness could have a long-term impact. You inspire new supporters and new fundraisers, and before you know it one action has triggered hundreds more just like yours. Pretty cool, huh?

3. Get motivated

Let’s be honest, running a half marathon is hard! There may be moments when you doubt yourself and reconsider whether the early morning winter runs, the slips on the ice and the pressure to get fitter are worth it. In fact, we see a huge drop-out rate of runners because they haven’t trained enough or couldn’t brave the brisk weather on race morning. But a charity runner is lacing up their running shoes for a cause, for their family and friends that have sponsored them, for the impact they know they will have on people who need help the most. They are running for those who can’t – what’s better motivation than that?

4. Gain a support network

When that motivation is slipping, we need people around us to support our goal and tell us to keep going. To provide us with advice, tips and opportunities to help us soldier on. Running for a charity means you are part of a team that is supporting each other to achieve a common goal. Many charities have team meet ups, Facebook groups, and regular email communications to ensure you never feel alone on your journey to the finish line.

5. Make new friends

Joining a charity team is a fantastic way to meet new people and make friends. You already have two things in common: you like running and you care about the same charity – that’s a good start! Runners often share training runs and arrange regular meet ups, you are sometimes invited to team events where you can ‘mingle’ with your team mates, and many charities offer access to a dedicated marquee on race day where you can meet other runners and start the race together.

6. Get added extras on race day

Not only do you have the support of your friends, family and fellow runners, but you also have the full support of the charity you are running for. All charities vary in the level of supportive benefits they can provide, but offerings can include a branded running vest, a fundraising pack, regular emails of encouragement, Christmas cards, branded merchandise, pre-event meet ups, race day hospitality, dedicated baggage area (The Sussex Beacon only at the Brighton Half), food and beverages, cheer teams along the course, post-race reception and free photography.

7. Tick off something from your life ‘bucket list’

For many, running a half marathon is an experience they have never felt before – the buzzing atmosphere as thousands of runners wait eagerly at the start line, the roaring cheers from the crowds, the emotional ups and downs of the course, the feeling of determination as you resist the urge to give up, the elation as you cross the finish line, the pride as you receive your medal, the gratitude of a goody bag and a massage at the end! Running for charity enhances every moment, starting with team mates on a common mission, crowds chanting the name on your charity running vest, the motivation to keep going for those who are relying on you to finish, the euphoria of knowing you have made a difference to more than one life when you crossed that finish line and receive that medal for every person, child or animal you fundraised to help.

8. Improve your health & wellbeing

Whether you are running to shift those few extra pounds you gained over Christmas from too much turkey and chocolate, boost your overall fitness levels, tone up ready for summer, clear your mind or just need a hobby, running The Grand Brighton Half Marathon is a great opportunity to reach your goal, whatever that may be. Motivation and support are key to achieving our goals, so run for charity to give you the best chance of succeeding!

9. Feel happier

Doing good makes you feel good, right? And that’s not the only reason running for charity can make you happier. It’s a social activity, and studies have shown that socialising can decrease feelings of depression and boost feelings of well-being. Running itself is fantastic for our mental health, it also combats depression, improves our capacity to learn new information, alleviates anxiety, helps us sleep and can even boost self-esteem. But you need to stick at it, so you need that motivation and support to reap the benefits.

10. Do something different

If we did the same things every day, life would get a bit dull. Fundraising for charity opens up a world of opportunities to do weird and wacky things, tackle new challenges, have new experiences and meet new people. Often winter can be a time we slip into mundane routines of staying indoors, watching tv and eating junk food. Why not make a change this year: register to run for a charity in The Grand Brighton Half Marathon – who knows what opportunities and experiences you will unlock!

See all our charity partners here.

By Rosie Hemming, Challenge Events Fundraiser, The Sussex Beacon