Tag archives for: brighton half marathon

A new look for the 2021 event

Meet Beaky

As the race enters its fourth decade in 2021, we’ve had a bit of revamp in the style stakes. We want the event branding to really get to the heart of our event: colourful, quirky and quintessentially Brighton!

Seagulls are a sight you’ll spot within a few seconds of arriving in the seafront city and the bird takes pride of place in our new logo. The gull’s name is of course ’Beaky’ – a nod to the fact that the event is organised by local charity The Sussex Beacon and event proceeds each year go directly to help those living with HIV.

What do you think of our new look? Let us know on TwitterInstagramFacebook or by email – we’d love to hear what you think!

A changing running scene since this year’s event

Since we held our 30th anniversary race back in February this year, the running scene has changed dramatically and in ways we could never have imagined at the start of the year.  We were very fortunate that we were able to hold the 2020 race, and our heart goes out to fellow event organisers – and runners taking part in these events – who have faced such an unpredictable path over the past few months.

We know how much running and exercise means to so many people and if lockdown has shown us one thing, it is that people who may not have run regularly for many years have taken the opportunity to dust down their trainers and head outdoors.

The beauty of running is that it can of course be a solitary sport. We hope you have managed to keep running during uncertain times.

Take care and we hope to see you on the start line in 2021.

Martin and the BHM team


A big thank you to everyone who took part in race day 2020

Women's Race winner

Nearly 8,000 runners turned out for our special 30th anniversary edition of the Brighton Half yesterday. Whether you were running, volunteering or spectating, we’d like to say a huge thank you every single one of you for braving the elements and taking part to make race day 2020 such an extra special day.

The race klaxon was sounded at 9:30am by the original 1990 race winner, David Knight, and Brighton’s favourite resident, Norman Cook, also waved the runners off on their journey around the city’s sights.

The race field featured hundreds of runners new to the half marathon distance, plus experienced half marathoners and runners training for a full Spring marathon. Thousands of spectators lined the route to cheer on the runners and crowds were entertained with music from The Sundaes and Alex Banks playing live at The Grand Brighton, headline sponsor of the race.

In the men’s race Brighton resident Kevin Moore took first place in an amazing time of 69 minutes and 5 seconds; second place went to Neil Boniface, who came home in 69 minutes and 17 seconds; third place went to four times race winner Paul Martelletti in 69 minutes and 40 seconds.

The women’s race was won by Phillipa Williams, who absolutely stormed home in an incredible 77 minutes and 55 seconds, followed by Heather Noone in 79 minutes and 53 seconds. Third place went to Maisie Trafford in 81 minutes and 08 seconds.

The Sussex Beacon Wheelchair Race also returned, with three entrants from the Coventry Godiva Harriers. First place went to Gary Cooper, who finished in 80 minutes and 49 seconds; Rob Smith came second in 92 minutes and 25 seconds. The female winner was local girl, Ellie Page who came home in 96 minutes and 39 seconds.

Alongside the elite field, thousands of charity runners took to the streets of the city, raising around one million pounds for over 35 charities, including local charities The Sussex Beacon and Chestnut Tree House, and national charities including Alzheimer’s Society and Macmillan.

Race director Martin Harrigan commented:
“What a race we had today! We are deeply honoured that nearly 8,000 runners braved the high winds and stormy conditions to run The Grand Brighton Half Marathon this morning. So many inspiring people, running for fantastic causes. Thank you to all families, spectators and volunteers who came out today to make The Grand Brighton Half Marathon such an incredible event! We couldn’t be more grateful to you all.

“I would also like to say a huge thank you to our headline sponsor, The Grand Brighton hotel and all of the other sponsors and charities who support this fantastic event.”

Andrew Mosley, general manager at main sponsor The Grand Brighton said:
“We couldn’t be more thrilled to have been headline sponsors of The Grand Brighton Half Marathon for our third year. It’s an incredible sight to see so many runners come from far and wide for such a fantastic event supporting great causes. Your contributions to The Sussex Beacon and all of the other race partners is immensely valued, particularly on this year’s 30th anniversary celebration. The race village had an amazing atmosphere once again, and it was a real privilege to greet runners at the finish line. Well done to everyone who took part in this year’s race!”


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February 4, 2020 at 10:22 am

Brighton Half Marathon 2020  |  Race news

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2 weeks to go: Taper time!

Tapering your training

It’s time to start the all-important final aspect of your training: tapering.

Whilst it may seem counter-intuitive, tapering is essential to preventing injury before the big day, and ensuring you perform at your very best. So, try to keep your excitement under control, and resist the urge to train like mad, as the countdown begins!

What is tapering?

The taper period is when you reduce the intensity of your training as the half marathon approaches, to allow your body to properly recover and adjust. Each runner’s requirements will differ, and the person with whom you develop your training plan will help you plan the most effective taper period for your body.

Why is tapering important?

Tapering can dramatically reduce your risk of sustaining an injury during the race and prevent problems during your recovery period too.

During your taper period, your muscle glycogen levels return to their optimal level. Various enzymes, hormones and antioxidants, which are depleted during training, also return to their peak levels, and muscle and connective tissue is given chance to repair and strengthen in time for race day. Tapering also allows your immune system to improve dramatically after the strain of training.

The tapering period is also when your body will reap the benefits of training. The ways in which your performance improves through training are called ‘training adaptations’ and require a certain amount of rest to take place. This means that while you may not be working as hard during your taper, it’s an essential step towards being at your fittest and fastest by the time race day comes around.

Science for maximum performance

With your hard training done and your tapering period about to begin, there’s every chance you’re already keeping to a nutrient-rich diet to ensure maximum performance – but have you considered how you’ll stay hydrated and energized during the race? Runners Need has a wide range of nutrition and hydration foods and supplements to keep your blood sugar levels at peak and prevent the dreaded flagging. Visit Runners Need’s in-store experts to find the on-the-go products guaranteed to help you power through.


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January 23, 2020 at 6:00 am

Brighton Half Marathon 2020  |  Race news

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How to prevent injuries in the lead up to race day

Runners

With the countdown to The Grand Brighton Half Marathon officially underway, it’s important to look after yourself during this intense time, and make sure you don’t sustain any injuries before the big day. We’ve teamed up with our partner Runners Need to bring you expert advice on avoiding injury to make sure you’re in top shape for race day.

Listen to your body

Bear in mind that every runner is different. We all have different injury thresholds, which means that the golden rule when training for the half marathon is to listen to your body. Being honest with yourself about your limits, and not forcing your body past them, will mean more effective training, a minimised risk of injury and, most of all, a happy and successful race.

Before a run: preparation is everything

The importance of warming up before a run cannot be emphasised enough. Warming up is essential for reducing your risk of injury. It loosens up your muscles, gets your heart rate up and primes your body for exercise. Plus, starting with a warm-up jog prevents you from getting too tired on your run and stopping your run early, which can harm your motivation.

Strength training in the gym alongside running is critical to half marathon success, particularly targeting glutes, calves and hamstrings. It helps to prevent injury in these key areas by building up the muscle in your legs, therefore preparing them for endurance running. Building a strong core is also essential for running form, as it stabilises your upper body which improves your posture and speed.

During your run: be methodical

During your training runs is when listening to your body comes into play. Running injuries don’t suddenly appear: there are always warning signs (aches, pains, soreness) which you need to be careful not to ignore. It’s also important to remember that recovery days exist to allow your muscles time to repair, and over-training will only increase your risk of injury, so ensure you have – and stick to! – a training plan which includes enough recovery time.

In fact, a training plan is a cornerstone of effective half marathon training. Plans are entirely individual and depend on the runner’s current fitness level, running goal and time available. You should consult a running specialist to help you establish an attainable goal and develop a plan which will ensure you reach it without hurting yourself.

During your half marathon training, you should gradually increase your mileage to ensure you don’t put too much stress on your body before it’s ready – a sure way to get injured. Varying the pace and length of your runs will allow you to train for both speed and endurance leading up to the half marathon and will make sure you’re not putting too much consistent strain on your body. A great tip is to check out the profile of the course you’ll be running so you can prepare accordingly, such as if the course is particularly hilly. Luckily for you, the Brighton half marathon course is nice and flat!

A tapering period, in which you cut down on training as the half marathon approaches, can dramatically reduce your risk of injury on the day, and prevent problems during your recovery period. Every runner’s tapering period will differ in length and intensity, and the person with whom you develop your training plan will advise you on this. Tapering may seem counterintuitive, and many runners believe it will damage their performance, but your hard training should be done by this time. Tapering is a chance for the changes you’ve made to take effect: the ways in which you grow faster and fitter through training are called ‘training adaptations’, and actually take place during recovery. So, whilst you’re running less in your taper period, your body is still working hard to get you ready for race day.

After a session: don’t underestimate recovery

You must never forget to properly recover after every run. Recovery is as important to half marathon preparation as training is, and a necessary step to prevent injuries. Stretching to cool down after every run is a must, as is using rollers and massage kits to keep your circulation going and rid the body of toxins. Again, ensuring your training plan includes scheduled recovery days after hard or long sessions is key.

Peak performance from the ground up

Running in the right shoes is essential not only for preventing injuries, but for performing at your best and getting the most out of your training. Runners Need offers free gait analysis and shoe fittings with in-store experts, who will help match you with your perfect running shoe. You’ll also find the latest innovations in performance fabrics, high-tech gadgets and nutrition science, as well as advice born from experience to help you smash the race!


Charity of the Week: Alzheimer’s Society

Join Alzheimer's Society

Dementia devastates lives. It strips away memories, relationships and connections to the world. For someone with the condition, as well as their family and friends, dementia means the plans you made, and the future you thought you had, will not be so.

By 2025, over a million people will be living with the condition. Of the world’s top ten killer diseases, it’s the only one we can’t cure, prevent or even slow down. Too many people face dementia alone, finding it difficult to know who to turn to or where to go for information and support.

At Alzheimer’s Society, we know it doesn’t have to be like this. We are investing more money than ever in dementia research and until the day we find a cure, we will be here for anyone affected by dementia – wherever they are, whatever they’re going through.

Run for Team Macmillan

Alzheimer’s Society are the UK’s leading dementia charity. Every day, we work tirelessly to find new treatments and, ultimately, a cure for dementia. We provide expert information, training, and support services to all those who need our help. And we are creating a more dementia friendly society so people with the condition can live without fear and prejudice.

How you can help

We want to stop dementia in its tracks through research. We’re committed to spending £150 million on cutting-edge research over the next decade but can only do this with the support of people like you. By joining Team Alzheimer’s Society at the Brighton Half Marathon, you can help us continue investing in our researchers and get us closer to our vision of a world without dementia.

£75 can pay for 20 microtome blades, used to create slices of the brain the thickness of a human hair. This enables researchers to study the intricate detail of brain cells, and the toxic proteins that cause dementia.

£100 covers Alzheimer’s Society’s cost of supporting one patient with early stage Alzheimer’s for three months on one of our vital trials. Their time and dedication provide us with the potential to treat symptoms and slow the progression of dementia.

£250 can pay for 100 microlitres of a special chemical that is applied to brain tissue, allowing researchers to study how brain cells are affected by the disease.

The benefits of joining Team Alzheimer’s Society

In return we’ll support you every step of the way, and provide you with some fantastic benefits:

  • A fundraising pack with advice and inspiration to help you smash your target
  • An Alzheimer’s Society running top to wear with pride on the day
  • Access to our training zone, with training guides for all abilities as well as information from our professional coaches on everything you need to get you race-ready, including nutrition and tapering
  • The most incredible race-day experience with the loudest cheer points on the course and a hero’s welcome at our post-race marquee where you can pick up some refreshments
  • Most importantly, the knowledge that you are helping Alzheimer’s Society get one step closer to beating dementia

Join Team Alzheimer’s Society at the Brighton Half Marathon and you miles can help us beat dementia.

Run for Team Macmillan


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December 15, 2019 at 6:00 am

All news  |  Brighton Half Marathon 2020  |  Charity news  |  Race news

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Make a difference with every step for Chestnut Tree House

Join Team Chestnut

 

Become a half marathon hero with Team Chestnut whilst helping children and young people with life-shortening conditions across Sussex and South East Hampshire.

Amazing people like you help so many families every year. You help families create precious memories together at Chestnut Tree House, help care for children in their own homes, help give carers time to recharge their batteries, and help parents through the most difficult time of saying goodbye.

 

Whether you’re a running rookie or distance dynamo, we’re here for every step of your journey. As a Chestnut Tree House runner you’ll be invited to our coffee catch ups and training runs, plus we’ll be there to cheer you along on the day and welcome you home with well-deserved refreshments.

You’ll also get a bespoke Chestnut Tree House running vest to wear with pride during training runs and on the day. All we ask for joining Team Chestnut is that you commit to raising £200.

 

The money you raise helps in so many ways and really does make a huge difference in the lives of children and families across Sussex. Here are just a few ways it helps…

  • £150: Allows a family of four to stay overnight together at Chestnut Tree House knowing their child is cared for all night.
  • £220: Gives carers a few hours respite and time together as their child is cared for in their own home.
  • £230: Puts on a ‘Stay & Play’ session at Chestnut Tree House for children to enjoy a range of activities and make precious memories.
  • £268: Means 5 families and their children can enjoy time together and feel free in the hydrotherapy pool at Chestnut Tree House.
  • £285: Covers the cost of all care services provided at Chestnut Tree House for one hour.

Join Team Chestnut. For yourself. For local families. For making precious memories. For the Now.

If you have any questions about joining Team Chestnut or your fundraising, please feel free to call us anytime on 01903 706355, we are here to help you throughout your fundraising journey with us.


Brighton Half Marathon: 6 Weeks to Go

Avoid injury with Runners Need

With the big day just six weeks away, nailing your half marathon training is essential to achieve your best performance effectively and painlessly! Scheduling in the right amount of hard training, easier runs and rest will ensure that your body is well prepared to power through the 13 miles. Our friends at Runners Need have put together a training guide to help you get the most from your last six weeks of training. Remember, though, this is only a guide, and you should always seek personalised training advice where possible.

Let’s start with the easy bit: every Monday, Thursday and Saturday for the last six weeks are rest days. It’s really important that you schedule in enough time for your body to recover, to ensure you don’t sustain any injuries and you are rested enough to perform at your best on race day.

Every Tuesday, you should do 40 minutes of easy running. This light exercise is intended to maintain your great results so far and keep your muscles moving, for an easy transition between hard training and rest days.

The first four Wednesdays of the six weeks leading up to the Brighton Half Marathon, you should do a 30-minute tempo run. A tempo run is one which is 25 to 30 seconds per mile quicker than your current race pace and improves speed and endurance in longer races like a half marathon. The last two Wednesdays (in our case, 13th and 20th February) should be rest days – this is your taper period.

Fridays and Sundays are where we alter the run types and lengths for maximum gain as the half marathon draws closer:

Fridays:

Week 1 (w/c 14th Jan) – 40 minutes interval running

Week 2 – 50 minutes interval running or cross training

Week 3 – 50 minutes interval running

Week 4 – 40 minutes interval running or cross training

Week 5 – 40 minutes interval running

Week 6 – 50 minutes easy running

Sundays:

Week 1 – Run 5 miles (8km)

Week 2 –Run 10 miles (16km)

Week 3 – Run 5 miles (8km)

Week 4 – Run 12 miles (19km)

Week 5 – Run 6 miles (10km) at race pace

Week 6 – Run the Brighton Half Marathon!

Following this training plan, or a similar one recommended for you, will ensure that your body is in the best possible condition for the race. From Runners Need, the very best of luck to everyone participating in the Brighton Half Marathon!


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December 9, 2018 at 5:00 am

Charity news  |  Race news  |  The 2019 race

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Run with Team Beacon and support the charity behind The Grand Brighton Half Marathon!

Run with Team Beacon and support the charity behind The Grand Brighton Half Marathon!

Over the last three years of The Grand Brighton Half Marathon, Team Beacon has rapidly grown with 600 runners fundraising over £86,000 for The Sussex Beacon. Thanks to their dedicated support and generosity, we have been able to provide specialist care and support to many people living with HIV.

2018 was a big year for Team Beacon, as we provided extra special and exclusive facilities in the race village for our runners to maximize the race day experience for Team Beacon. We were thrilled to meet our runners, to celebrate with them as they proudly posed with their medals for free professional photos and to congratulate them with well-deserved sweet treats and hot soup.

Check out the feedback from our 2018 Team Beacon here.

Due to the fantastic feedback and rocketing Team Beacon sign up numbers for the 2019 race, our team are busy working on an even better marquee for our dedicated runners and supporters. Our spectacular Team Beacon marquee promises to deliver an exclusive baggage area, warming and delicious catering, photographer, comfy seating, motivational music, post-race reception and much more – all in one place in the race village! Thanks to our loyal sponsor Glencairn Consulting Ltd, our runners will also receive their technical Team Beacon running vest straight to their door, so they can train proudly in their team colours. Fundraising resources, competitions, training runs and race day information is just a few taps away with our Team Beacon Facebook Group, where runners can ask questions and share training tips. All runners will be supported by our Challenge Events Fundraiser from the moment they sign up, to the moment they receive their personalised celebratory certificate in March 2019.

The Sussex Beacon needs you!

Over 101,000 people live with HIV in the UK, a number which increases every day. With daily medication people living with HIV can lead normal lives, however many suffer with psychological effects and HIV-related illnesses, such as cancer and dementia. The complex combination of HIV and related illnesses require specialist treatment. Brighton has the 2nd highest HIV prevalence in the UK, and access to specialist care and support is vital. With a 10-bed inpatient unit, The Sussex Beacon provides 24 hour medical and psychological care to people struggling with a new diagnosis, starting new medication, recovering from HIV-related cancer treatment and dementia, requiring family services and end of life care. Most of all, it provides a safe, comforting place for patients in their time of need. You can help us continue to offer support to those who need it most.

If you would like to be a part of Team Beacon and experience a race day like no other, find out more and secure your place now.


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November 29, 2018 at 4:54 pm

Charity news  |  Race news  |  The 2019 race

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Meet the charity behind the event

 

The Brighton Half Marathon celebrates its 29th birthday on race day 2019 – but did you know the race is a charity event, organised by local HIV charity The Sussex Beacon? As World Aids Day approaches on 1st December, find out about the local charity behind a very big race.

The Grand Brighton Half Marathon is The Sussex Beacon’s largest fundraising event each year, where we welcome 12,000 runners and thousands of spectators to celebrate running in the city. Unbeknownst to many, The Sussex Beacon has been involved in the event since its early days in the 1990s.

The Sussex Beacon cause

Brighton has the 2nd highest HIV prevalence in the UK, and access to specialist care and support is vital. With a 10-bed inpatient unit, The Sussex Beacon provides 24 hour medical and psychological care to people struggling with a new diagnosis, starting new medication, recovering from HIV-related cancer treatment and dementia, requiring family services and end of life care. Most of all, it provides a safe, comforting place for patients in their time of need.

Over 100,000 people live with HIV in the UK, a number which increases every day. With daily medication people living with HIV can lead normal lives, however many suffer with psychological effects and HIV-related illnesses, such as cancer and dementia. The complex combination of HIV and related illnesses require specialist treatment.

World Aids Day

Saturday 1st December marks World AIDS Day, a day dedicated to raising awareness of HIV/AIDS. It’s an opportunity for our community (and the world!) to unite in the fight against HIV, to remember those who have died, and to show our support for those living with HIV today.

Show your support

The Sussex Beacon has its own running team in the event – Team Beacon. If you already have a general race place you can also fundraise for the charity as an ‘own place runner‘- every little amount of fundraising really does help. You could also show your support on race day by rocking a red ribbon on your race kit.

Find out more about the wider work of The Sussex Beacon on the charity’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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July 26, 2018 at 2:49 pm

Charity news  |  Race news  |  The 2019 race

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10 reasons to run for charity


Ever considered running for charity? Here are 10 reasons to use your run for good.

1. Raise funds for a cause close to your heart

Using a personal challenge to raise funds for a good cause that you truly care about is an amazing thing. A few pounds from your family and friends  can quickly mount up and help a good cause. You could be funding medical treatment for a person in need, a day out for a poorly child, a help line for vulnerable people, access to water for children without, animals who need protection, life-saving medical research, emotional support for people undergoing treatment or psychological support for people with mental health issues. If you are signing up to run an event, you have the opportunity to share your achievements with others who truly need it.

2. Raise awareness of the charity

Money is not all that is important for charities. Runners will often wear a charity vest provided by their chosen charity, many of you will set up a JustGiving page and a lot of you will share your journey on your multiple social media channels. For every person who sees your challenge, someone is learning about the charity and their cause. Raising awareness can be just as key as raising funds, and this awareness could have a long-term impact. You inspire new supporters and new fundraisers, and before you know it one action has triggered hundreds more just like yours. Pretty cool, huh?

3. Get motivated

Let’s be honest, running a half marathon is hard! There may be moments when you doubt yourself and reconsider whether the early morning winter runs, the slips on the ice and the pressure to get fitter are worth it. In fact, we see a huge drop-out rate of runners because they haven’t trained enough or couldn’t brave the brisk weather on race morning. But a charity runner is lacing up their running shoes for a cause, for their family and friends that have sponsored them, for the impact they know they will have on people who need help the most. They are running for those who can’t – what’s better motivation than that?

4. Gain a support network

When that motivation is slipping, we need people around us to support our goal and tell us to keep going. To provide us with advice, tips and opportunities to help us soldier on. Running for a charity means you are part of a team that is supporting each other to achieve a common goal. Many charities have team meet ups, Facebook groups, and regular email communications to ensure you never feel alone on your journey to the finish line.

5. Make new friends

Joining a charity team is a fantastic way to meet new people and make friends. You already have two things in common: you like running and you care about the same charity – that’s a good start! Runners often share training runs and arrange regular meet ups, you are sometimes invited to team events where you can ‘mingle’ with your team mates, and many charities offer access to a dedicated marquee on race day where you can meet other runners and start the race together.

6. Get added extras on race day

Not only do you have the support of your friends, family and fellow runners, but you also have the full support of the charity you are running for. All charities vary in the level of supportive benefits they can provide, but offerings can include a branded running vest, a fundraising pack, regular emails of encouragement, Christmas cards, branded merchandise, pre-event meet ups, race day hospitality, dedicated baggage area (The Sussex Beacon only at the Brighton Half), food and beverages, cheer teams along the course, post-race reception and free photography.

7. Tick off something from your life ‘bucket list’

For many, running a half marathon is an experience they have never felt before – the buzzing atmosphere as thousands of runners wait eagerly at the start line, the roaring cheers from the crowds, the emotional ups and downs of the course, the feeling of determination as you resist the urge to give up, the elation as you cross the finish line, the pride as you receive your medal, the gratitude of a goody bag and a massage at the end! Running for charity enhances every moment, starting with team mates on a common mission, crowds chanting the name on your charity running vest, the motivation to keep going for those who are relying on you to finish, the euphoria of knowing you have made a difference to more than one life when you crossed that finish line and receive that medal for every person, child or animal you fundraised to help.

8. Improve your health & wellbeing

Whether you are running to shift those few extra pounds you gained over Christmas from too much turkey and chocolate, boost your overall fitness levels, tone up ready for summer, clear your mind or just need a hobby, running The Grand Brighton Half Marathon is a great opportunity to reach your goal, whatever that may be. Motivation and support are key to achieving our goals, so run for charity to give you the best chance of succeeding!

9. Feel happier

Doing good makes you feel good, right? And that’s not the only reason running for charity can make you happier. It’s a social activity, and studies have shown that socialising can decrease feelings of depression and boost feelings of well-being. Running itself is fantastic for our mental health, it also combats depression, improves our capacity to learn new information, alleviates anxiety, helps us sleep and can even boost self-esteem. But you need to stick at it, so you need that motivation and support to reap the benefits.

10. Do something different

If we did the same things every day, life would get a bit dull. Fundraising for charity opens up a world of opportunities to do weird and wacky things, tackle new challenges, have new experiences and meet new people. Often winter can be a time we slip into mundane routines of staying indoors, watching tv and eating junk food. Why not make a change this year: register to run for a charity in The Grand Brighton Half Marathon – who knows what opportunities and experiences you will unlock!

See all our charity partners here.

By Rosie Hemming, Challenge Events Fundraiser, The Sussex Beacon