Tag archives for: Brighton

A new look for the 2021 event

Meet Beaky

As the race enters its fourth decade in 2021, we’ve had a bit of revamp in the style stakes. We want the event branding to really get to the heart of our event: colourful, quirky and quintessentially Brighton!

Seagulls are a sight you’ll spot within a few seconds of arriving in the seafront city and the bird takes pride of place in our new logo. The gull’s name is of course ’Beaky’ – a nod to the fact that the event is organised by local charity The Sussex Beacon and event proceeds each year go directly to help those living with HIV.

What do you think of our new look? Let us know on TwitterInstagramFacebook or by email – we’d love to hear what you think!

A changing running scene since this year’s event

Since we held our 30th anniversary race back in February this year, the running scene has changed dramatically and in ways we could never have imagined at the start of the year.  We were very fortunate that we were able to hold the 2020 race, and our heart goes out to fellow event organisers – and runners taking part in these events – who have faced such an unpredictable path over the past few months.

We know how much running and exercise means to so many people and if lockdown has shown us one thing, it is that people who may not have run regularly for many years have taken the opportunity to dust down their trainers and head outdoors.

The beauty of running is that it can of course be a solitary sport. We hope you have managed to keep running during uncertain times.

Take care and we hope to see you on the start line in 2021.

Martin and the BHM team


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February 4, 2020 at 10:22 am

Brighton Half Marathon 2020  |  Race news

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2 weeks to go: Taper time!

Tapering your training

It’s time to start the all-important final aspect of your training: tapering.

Whilst it may seem counter-intuitive, tapering is essential to preventing injury before the big day, and ensuring you perform at your very best. So, try to keep your excitement under control, and resist the urge to train like mad, as the countdown begins!

What is tapering?

The taper period is when you reduce the intensity of your training as the half marathon approaches, to allow your body to properly recover and adjust. Each runner’s requirements will differ, and the person with whom you develop your training plan will help you plan the most effective taper period for your body.

Why is tapering important?

Tapering can dramatically reduce your risk of sustaining an injury during the race and prevent problems during your recovery period too.

During your taper period, your muscle glycogen levels return to their optimal level. Various enzymes, hormones and antioxidants, which are depleted during training, also return to their peak levels, and muscle and connective tissue is given chance to repair and strengthen in time for race day. Tapering also allows your immune system to improve dramatically after the strain of training.

The tapering period is also when your body will reap the benefits of training. The ways in which your performance improves through training are called ‘training adaptations’ and require a certain amount of rest to take place. This means that while you may not be working as hard during your taper, it’s an essential step towards being at your fittest and fastest by the time race day comes around.

Science for maximum performance

With your hard training done and your tapering period about to begin, there’s every chance you’re already keeping to a nutrient-rich diet to ensure maximum performance – but have you considered how you’ll stay hydrated and energized during the race? Runners Need has a wide range of nutrition and hydration foods and supplements to keep your blood sugar levels at peak and prevent the dreaded flagging. Visit Runners Need’s in-store experts to find the on-the-go products guaranteed to help you power through.


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December 15, 2019 at 6:00 am

All news  |  Brighton Half Marathon 2020  |  Charity news  |  Race news

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Make a difference with every step for Chestnut Tree House

Join Team Chestnut

 

Become a half marathon hero with Team Chestnut whilst helping children and young people with life-shortening conditions across Sussex and South East Hampshire.

Amazing people like you help so many families every year. You help families create precious memories together at Chestnut Tree House, help care for children in their own homes, help give carers time to recharge their batteries, and help parents through the most difficult time of saying goodbye.

 

Whether you’re a running rookie or distance dynamo, we’re here for every step of your journey. As a Chestnut Tree House runner you’ll be invited to our coffee catch ups and training runs, plus we’ll be there to cheer you along on the day and welcome you home with well-deserved refreshments.

You’ll also get a bespoke Chestnut Tree House running vest to wear with pride during training runs and on the day. All we ask for joining Team Chestnut is that you commit to raising £200.

 

The money you raise helps in so many ways and really does make a huge difference in the lives of children and families across Sussex. Here are just a few ways it helps…

  • £150: Allows a family of four to stay overnight together at Chestnut Tree House knowing their child is cared for all night.
  • £220: Gives carers a few hours respite and time together as their child is cared for in their own home.
  • £230: Puts on a ‘Stay & Play’ session at Chestnut Tree House for children to enjoy a range of activities and make precious memories.
  • £268: Means 5 families and their children can enjoy time together and feel free in the hydrotherapy pool at Chestnut Tree House.
  • £285: Covers the cost of all care services provided at Chestnut Tree House for one hour.

Join Team Chestnut. For yourself. For local families. For making precious memories. For the Now.

If you have any questions about joining Team Chestnut or your fundraising, please feel free to call us anytime on 01903 706355, we are here to help you throughout your fundraising journey with us.


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November 7, 2019 at 3:39 pm

All news  |  Brighton Half Marathon 2020  |  Race news

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The Active for Life Running Challenge youth programme

The Sussex Beacon, the charity behind the Brighton Half Marathon, have been working in partnership with Active for Life on their annual Running Challenge programme for several years. The programme offers reduced entry into our Brighton Half Youth Races, a fun, one-mile race aimed at children of all abilities aged 7-17.

The Active for Life Running Challenge programme supports children in Y3-Y6 to train and participate in The Brighton Half Youth Race and the Mini Mile; two prestigious local running events.

The goal is to set yourself a challenge to run your personal best at both races.

The Active for Life team work with local schools to target those children who are the least active and /or would like the opportunity to get involved with the Running Challenge to help boost their confidence and self-esteem through physical activity. It also helps with getting the young people active and achieving their Active 60 Minutes a day and hopefully also inspiring their families to get involved too.

The project is run by Brighton & Hove City Council, Healthy Lifestyles team, to support people in the city to lead active lifestyles. Active for Life has grown into a city-wide initiative which reaches out to thousands of Brighton & Hove residents every year, supporting them to become more active, more often.

To find out more about Running Challenge email Vanessa.lynham@brighton-hove.gov.uk

“My grandson joined Active for Life after discussions with school and his physiotherapist at Seaside view. He suffers from DCD and his mobility is challenging for him at times. He had little confidence to join in sports as he had low self-esteem around his size and ‘clumsiness’ as he described it. We encouraged him to give it a go and see how he felt after a couple of sessions.

“You have all been very supportive with encouraging him that it’s all about the taking part and not the competitiveness.  He has achieved so much more self-esteem since he began, although it’s a work in progress. He was so proud of himself after completing his Youth Race and didn’t stop telling everyone and showing his medal off. He is really looking forward to completing his next run in April and getting another medal for his collection.”

 

“My daughter’s participation in the AFL Running Challenge has hugely raised her self-confidence and self-esteem. Being able to find a platform where her skills and abilities are rewarded and acknowledged away from academic success, has undoubtedly built on her own self-worth and her understanding that we all have skills in different areas.

“The running challenge enables her to shine, and challenge herself, away from the pressures of academia. For all learners, like my daughter, I think this is vital in building their resilience and self-confidence at a time when pressures on young people from social media etc are at an all-time high. 

“I also feel that the team spirit involved in the training and on the day of events is a wonderful and rewarding experience for all of them. They are able to bond over their experiences, positive and negative and support each other’s involvement. It’s not just about winning but about taking part and supporting each other, regardless of ability.”


Brighton Half Marathon: 6 Weeks to Go

Avoid injury with Runners Need

With the big day just six weeks away, nailing your half marathon training is essential to achieve your best performance effectively and painlessly! Scheduling in the right amount of hard training, easier runs and rest will ensure that your body is well prepared to power through the 13 miles. Our friends at Runners Need have put together a training guide to help you get the most from your last six weeks of training. Remember, though, this is only a guide, and you should always seek personalised training advice where possible.

Let’s start with the easy bit: every Monday, Thursday and Saturday for the last six weeks are rest days. It’s really important that you schedule in enough time for your body to recover, to ensure you don’t sustain any injuries and you are rested enough to perform at your best on race day.

Every Tuesday, you should do 40 minutes of easy running. This light exercise is intended to maintain your great results so far and keep your muscles moving, for an easy transition between hard training and rest days.

The first four Wednesdays of the six weeks leading up to the Brighton Half Marathon, you should do a 30-minute tempo run. A tempo run is one which is 25 to 30 seconds per mile quicker than your current race pace and improves speed and endurance in longer races like a half marathon. The last two Wednesdays (in our case, 13th and 20th February) should be rest days – this is your taper period.

Fridays and Sundays are where we alter the run types and lengths for maximum gain as the half marathon draws closer:

Fridays:

Week 1 (w/c 14th Jan) – 40 minutes interval running

Week 2 – 50 minutes interval running or cross training

Week 3 – 50 minutes interval running

Week 4 – 40 minutes interval running or cross training

Week 5 – 40 minutes interval running

Week 6 – 50 minutes easy running

Sundays:

Week 1 – Run 5 miles (8km)

Week 2 –Run 10 miles (16km)

Week 3 – Run 5 miles (8km)

Week 4 – Run 12 miles (19km)

Week 5 – Run 6 miles (10km) at race pace

Week 6 – Run the Brighton Half Marathon!

Following this training plan, or a similar one recommended for you, will ensure that your body is in the best possible condition for the race. From Runners Need, the very best of luck to everyone participating in the Brighton Half Marathon!